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If your waters are anything like my waters, and I am sure they are, you have areas that are loaded with stumps or dead standing timber. So many in fact that it is hard to determine which one to fish first. However we have all learned that not every stump or standing timber holds bass. So what is it that make certain stumps hold fish when others dont? And once we locate these "special" stumps and standing timber, what is the best way to get our fish off of them?

I am sure that everyone has their own way of answering these questions and i would like to hear exactly that. No matter how much your answers may differ from the previous guy(s) answer, we all would still like to hear what you have to say. I dont care what anyone says, even the most seasoned hardened angling veteran can learn something from the very newest of anglers. So please, everyone, jump on in and lets hear what you have to say on this topic :D
 
G

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The one that you caught a fish by :rofl1: :rofl1: :rofl1: Sorry I couldn't resist :)

Seriously, good question. I have fished my fair share of timber over the years, mostly in Texas. Some of the lakes I fish here in Florida have timber most notably the Stick Marsh. What I find that seems to resonate everywhere I go is the larger stumps tend to hold more fish then the small stobs.

I typically make it a point to cast to any larger then average stump or tree then the surrounding wood. If they are all the same like some of the cypress tree lakes around here, then I look for water depth. If you are fishing a forest of trees then what you should do is ignore the trees and focus on the structure on the bottom. For instance if you have a high spot or hump then focus on that area and the trees on that hump. This might be easy to notice by the standing timber being higher then other trees however, if they have all broke off at the water line then your electronics will be needed. Another thing is depressions or creek channels. Find these and then concentrate on the trees that line these creek channels. More often then not the larger tree stumps are the ones that are near to old creek channels.

I have also noticed that some types of wood holds more fish then others do. In Texas I used to fish a lake called Purtis Creek. In that lake Cedar trees are the ticket. You might as well almost forget about the hard wood tree stumps and focus on the cedar trees. I caught a few off the hardwoods but not like I used to around the cedar trees. They are easily identified as they are very light colored almost white like bleached out and have a structure similar to a christmas tree.

Let's see what others say on this now.
 

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Seems like maybe we covered this before on a lake Sam Rayburn thread. Unfortunately I don't get to fish large flooded wooded ares very often, so my experience is limited. When I do fish trees or stumps I try to look at them like you would look at any large area with the same type of cover and find isolated cover near channels, creek beds or whatever else may be a migration route or escape rout to deeper water nearby. The ambush sites are usually those that make up a point of entry or something on different type of soil transition. For example a tree growing near a stream bed bank where the stream meanders around it forming a higher hump that the tree set on before the lake was formed, would be isolated from a groove of similar trees located on a large flat area. This isolate tree may also have been a larger tree then the others close by. The stream may have undercut the bank this tree was standing on, leaving some big roots, rocks and a large hole on one side. I try to visualize where those isolated big trees may have stood and why they grew there. So trees that grew on humps or near the creek channels have the potentail of holding big bass because of the exposed roots , rocks, undercut bank etc and they are isolated from the groove nearby. A perfect example of such a tree is "Chinamens tree" in lake Isabella. This tree is located on a hump in the middle of know where on a S bend of the south fork Kern rover arm, a big bass magnet. Pauline's tree in lake Casitas is similar, an isolate cross roads tree on the intersection of an old road. The little orchard stumps that are nearby never hold anything worth while.
Once you locate a good ambush site that has a tree or stump plus other features like a weed bed or dock near structure like a channel or rock wall, then you have found a magnet that will hold bass year after year.
Tom
 

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I wished I knew how to determan which was the best or productive stumps.( same with docks ) I know I waist alot of time fishing the wrong ones.

My lures of choice mainly would be Senkos ( or mainly knock-offs ) and brush hogs.
 

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Try looking at a topo map of the area that you have found bass on trees/ stumps and determine if there is any structure, breaklines that maybe close by. See what I tried to say earlier above. If you have a bank with a hundred trees or docks, you shouldn't need to fish everyone of them and hope to catch a bass here and there, unless thats what you prefer doing. It's not the lure, there isn't a magic bullet, you need to find the bass first, then focus on what type of lure works best.
Tom
note; look at "wood" General Discussion, 22 Dec '06
 

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That sounds like something I may have said. The problem is some of you fish where cypress trees grow naturally in the water in natural lake or lowland reservoirs. Still there should be points, coves and entry/exit areas or zones where hollow trees offer ambush sites that differ from the rest of the groove. Trees located near channels and humps or different types of soil like maybe clam beds or something other than soft mud bottom. There is a reason bass choose one tree over the others and that reason is prey maybe available as easy meals. Sanctuary alone may not hold bass over the a period of time during any seasonal period, water temperature, current and food should be part of the equation.
Sometimes it's birds using the tree, especially fish eating or crab eating birds. The tree gives the birds a good advantage point or is close to where the birds feed, their droppings attract bait fish and bait equal food source for bass. Sanctuary and food equals a good bass ambush site. Try not to be stumped.
Tom
 
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