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Discussion Starter #1
How many of you use Senkos? What is your most productive way to rig and fish them?

Generally I will fish them texposed and dead stick them. However i have rigged them wackstyle with the use of a large split ring and a circle hook.

Id love to hear everyone's views, advice and tips on this bait. :thumbup01:
 
T

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I fish them that way too Jared. But sometimes I may put a split shot on the line about 12 to 16 inches above the senko, kind of like a c-rig, and fish it that way.
 
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I fish with them but mostly with knockoff brands. I fish them weightless 90% of the time.

I have fished them t-rigged with a 1/4 ounce weight before with success. I also use them when I flip quit often with a 1/2 ounce pegged weight. The reason I use them for flipping is they are the slimest style of bait available today and can slip through the tiniest of holes where a creature bait would hang up. Some of the places I flip these into if I used a creature bait I would have to upsize my weight to a 3/4 ounce or even a 1 ounce weight. If I can use a lighter weight while flipping and pitching into heavy hyacinth mats then I prefer that. Senko style baits excel at this.
 

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Senko's in my opinion make a poor choice for plastic worm. What makes a Senko good is it's slow sinking with slight movements appeal to bass, otherwise it's a stick without action on a quick fall. The newer paddle tail Senko may be a better choice for faster falling presentations or use a straight or fat body cut tail worm when fishing heavy cover.
Tom
 
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Senko's in my opinion make a poor choice for plastic worm....
Well, I would go out on a limb and say that ever since GYCB introduced this bait till now, that no other worm has caught more bass. Just a guess on my part, but like I said I would go out on that limb.

To me this has become the most effective worm and if I worm fish it is almost always with one of these style baits.
 

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I agree with Keith....


One time, in a tournament I was fishing I threw every bait in my boat, and worked up quite a sweat pounding out a small limit, and the guy who won the tournament got up on stage and said that he took a senko, rigged it texas style, threw it out as far as he could, and literally ate a sandwich and held on with one hand..

AND THEN WON THE TOURNAMENT





I hate those darn things too lol, but they are definitely a force to be reckoned with...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
but... whos to say that if someone else had deadsticked a different worm like he had done with the senko, that they wouldn't have done just as well? ;) What I am saying is... was it the bait OR was it the presentation and the pace of the presentation that paid off?

If the bait was sitting there doing nothing, then whos to say a deadsticked zoom finesse worm, centipede, sluggo or any other straight short lifeless worm wouldn't have worked? ;)

as far as no other worm catching as many fish as the senko since it was introduced... Id have to respectfully disagree with that idea. I would tend to believe that Zoom still has caught more fish in that same time frame.
 

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Senko's work well falling though the water column slowly. They are heavily loaded with salt to make them sink, therefor when they reach the bottom they lay flat against it, no movement. The bass may follow the Senko down or see the Senko hit the bottom and rest there, but if it doesn't move, the bass may loose interest unless it moves again. A weighted soft plastic worm floats up off the bottom with only the weight end sitting on the bottom and the worm is always in motion. Bass often pick up a dead stick plastic worm because it looks alive. If you C-rig a Senko, it drags along the bottom picking up muck, weeds etc, but it's moving and a bass may bite it, however a floating plastic worm C-rigged floats off the bottom and bass see this as a live opportunity more often.
You can substitute a Senko for a plastic worm and have success. The question should be why do it? Senkos are not very durable because of the heavy salt percentage to plastic and cost more than a fat soft plastic worm. Senkos are a great slow falling bait and thats how they should be used most of the time, in my opinion.
Tom
 

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I use the Alluring brand of ' senkos ' MAINLY.
Most of the time Texas rigged weightless, or with a 1 / 16th oz weight pegged. Sometimes wacky and very few times Carolina rigged.

Im sure other lures would work as good if not better, BUT I have CONFIDANCE in them and use them more then anything. ( makes a differance to have confidance )

I went out today with Al , pre-fishing for our up and coming tournament. Here is a keeper bass ( for our tournament anyways ) on an Alluring ' senko ' with a 1/16th oz weight pegged.

 

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After reading an article here & there covering Senkos I've fallen for the Bait Monkey snapping up bags of the baits and spent many whole days determined to master them. In short I won't buy more. I've caught bass on them, but not easily enough or fast enough. I score them very low for versatility, being good for the one niche made for, that Senko heavy salt fall Tom described, on a short pitch or flip. If the bass are wanting something like that and eating it before hitting bottom, then they shine a little. But once on bottom any imitation of life is up to the angler. I believe they are among the least desired for C-rigging, and don't hold up well cast distances and dragged through cover or structure. If the fish like it the Senko is good for one bite before tearing in half, similar to a GULP! worm.

A much better choice for me is a Getsem from River Bottom Lures, a creature plastic that's loaded with lard. Fish eat lard with a passion, and lard makes the plastic float seductively above a Spot Stalker or similar stay-put sinker. With those the hook rides up and the creature helps keep it oriented up. While up the very nature of lard dissolving into the water causes mini currents that jiggle the tail section perfectly. They are good for 3-4 solid bites more than a Senko. The same bait is excellent for a C-rig, apt to hang vertically above the bottom, nose rooting bottom.

Over time though I've learned to put the Senko back in the bag if it doesn't immediately produce. Maybe bass want a slower fall, or some bottom action more than a fast falling Senko. My usual go-to from that is a simple Zoom trick worm rigged T-posed for a slight downward gliding wriggle, the "floating worm" that gets so popular around here in pre-spawn and summer. It can be fished whacky style without tearing in half like a Senko, and works well on a drop shot rig, as well as shakey style. The trick worm is much more versatile.

Jim
 

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I never thought I'd say this, but I respectfully disagree with Jim and Tom. I don't use sinkos on c-rigs, but they are very good fished like flukes, or on a jighead after cold fronts. When the fish are moving slow, it's deadly. Also I have used them like a rat or frog, with the added bonus of letting them sink into holes in the grass. But I would have to say that 90% of my fishing with these lures is weightless. Also, I have been meaning to try the way Keith described, only with a 1/8 or 1/4 oz weight. The weight of the sinko would allow better distance for pitching than a finesse worm or trick worm would.
 
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Jared, comparing the Senko type worm means all of the worms like them not just GYCB. I rarely use GYCB I also use Alluring and Yum Dingers etc. They are more sturdy. Anyway, Zoom is a huge company with allot of different style baits. So I stand by my assessment that the senko type bait has caught more bass since it's inception then any other type of worm. Curly tail, speed worm, straight tail, etc.

Tom, I am not sure what it is that makes bass bite a senko type worm but when they are motionless on the bottom they will sure strike it. I have caught countless bass when the senko type bait just sat still.

I have also used a senko type bait like a fluke and caught fish. They are pretty versatile baits in my opinion.
 

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We must be talking two different languages. A Senko is a straight ball point pen looking fat worm with heavy salt content to makes it sink on it's own without adding addition weight. Anything else isn't a Senko to me. A Fluke is a soft jerk bait with a fish looking profile and tail that needs weight added to it to sink. The only time that I have had a bass pick up a dead sticked Senko is when bed fishing or just after moving it and thats not dead sticking to me, which is something that I don't have the patients for.
Whatever works for you...works. You fish a lot of shallow 1 to 4 feet of water, I don't. I know lots of fisherman who jumped on Senko's in the beginning, like Jim pointed out and now only use them during spawn or post spawn, putting them away for the balance of the year or not at all, including me.
Tom
 

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:thumbup01: Everybody wins when disagreement is accompanied by reason. I've spent a lot of time discussing this with Senko fans, and many times changed my mind to try "one more time". I think this is more along the lines of confidence differences. We've been talking occasionally about confidence applied to lures, but I think the Senko reaches into a deeper level out of which confidence emerges. It's more of a gut factor with me. I'm right handed, so of course I favor the right hand. Lots of other things I do that I haven't thought about no doubt happen not out of choice, but out of flesh convenience/habit. I'm wired a certain way. Fishing a Senko apparently doesn't fit my ego/patience/mechanical make-up so there's a built in dislike for it I won't have enough years of hours to overcome. For someone else the Senko is a good fit. Because it is from the get-go confidence in it builds and the bait doesn't betray them.

The largest local baitshop had Senkos on sale a few times last year. Even at reduced price they didn't sell well. Now they only carry a few selections. They just don't sell here well enough to carry much of the line. That's a good measure of what is popular, what is not. Many of the guys I know that did jump on the Senko train a few years back remember things like the tenderness and the price. Compared to a Zoom Trick worm it just didn't work out to justify messing with them. Yum Dingers caught on a while, but like the Senko, sales are low now.

In my opinion having seven ways to dead stick a worm isn't good versatility. If I could swim it, then there's some versatility. If it would work on a C-rig too, it would be even more versatile. Versatility means to me the ability to adapt to multiple techniques as well as methods. Dead sticking is one method, and ways to dead stick it are techniques. The Senko was made to fall and play dead. Imparting movement doesn't add realism to it. Only the fall is realistic.

Jim
 
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Here are the ways I have rigged and caught fish on these baits. I say baits because I use many brands. Alluring, Bass Pro Stick-O's, Chompers, Luck E Strike, GYCB, Yum Dingers, Wave Worms etc.

1) Weightless
2) Weighted with a bullet weight t-rigged
3) Wacky rigged
4) Split shot rigged
5) C-rigged
6) Flipping into grass with a pegged weight
7) Jerking it like a jerkbait.
8) Drop shot rigged

In my book that is pretty versatile.
 

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OK, I see what you mean. I was talking strictly Senkos and you had in mind other brands of similar worms that are tough enough to use other techniques not suited to a Senko. A Senko might last 5 minutes for #2, 3, 5 & 7 before tearing in half just from slinging and dragging through rough vegetation. Not to mention a strike.

Jim
 
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Exactly Jim. Not to mention Senko's cost .60 cents per bait. I think that is silly. Other cheaper brands catch fish too so why pay .60 cents per bait when I can pay .20 cents per bait?
 
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KeithsCatch said:
Exactly Jim. Not to mention Senko's cost .60 cents per bait. I think that is silly. Other cheaper brands catch fish too so why pay .60 cents per bait when I can pay .20 cents per bait?

Confidence!! I have fished with most of the brands you mentioned earlier but I have done the best fishing the GYCB Senko. I have more cofidence in them. Why? Because I catch more fish with the GYCB Senko. I have proven that to "myself." So all in all, I don't mind paying .60 cents per bait for a lure that catches more fish than a .20 cent per bait lure.

I'm not saying that senkos are for everyone. But they are for me.

Those other baits are good as well but in my opinion not better than the GYCB Senkos.
 

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I too have been on the Senko bandwagon for a few years. Believe it or not, I fish it wacky stlye and rarely fish it shallower than 10'. I have used this bait on deep grass beds on Rayburn and Tbend very successfully. It is a confidence thing though. I prefer GYCB over others. I use a 3/0 Gama with weed guard. I do hate their durability, because they have none, but when fishing is slow, for me there is no substitute. I will deadstick it if need be and while sitting on the bottom, I use my index finger to take up tension in the line and give it a little life. I have a lot of hours in a swimming pool trying to get different actions with different techniques. I do believe that this is a very versatile lure, and I fish NO WHERE without one tied on. Like you guys said, it is all about confidence. To each his own.

-Joe
 

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There is nothing wrong with Senko's when fished real slowly as they are designed to be fished. Another big bass presentation that is fished real slowly is stitching. If you have the patients to fish a Senko, then stitching should be for you. If you have ever read the late Bill Murphy's book "In Pursuit of Giant Bass" then there is a chapter on the stitching presentation described.
Stitching requires a split shot or pegged slip shot using 1/16 to 1/8 ounce weights above the worm and 8 to 16 inch straight or paddle tail worms. If you know how to finger retrieve a fly line when fly fishing using your index and baby fingers to wind in the line,or just pulling the line between your thumb and index finger an inch or two at a time, thats stitching. You simply cast out, let the worm settle to the bottom and inch it very slowly along the bottom back to the boat or past the target area. Some people use a plastic bucket to lay the stitched line into and then reel up the line in the bucket every 10 feet or so. This is very boring until a bass taps the worm, then you let the bass have the worm while you pick up the slack line and set it against the slowly moving line as the bass moves off with the worm. This may be the original "Senko" presentation and should work well using todays Senko's..
Tom
 
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