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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just found this site:

http://www.mobilegeographics.com:81/locations/4692.htm

and the diagram of the tides has me wondering some things.

Referrencing this image:


Dip A is the low tide as is Dip C
Arch D is the high tide

BUT...

what is dip B? To me it seems like a secondary minor low tide but I have never heard of such a thing. However if it is indeed that, and the water is dropping a half foot between D and B then that should create similiar activity, though to a lesser degree, to that of a falling tide. Yes?

I have always heard of rising, falling and stale tide. The diagram above makes me want to believe there really is no such thing as a stale tide, or if there is, it is very short lived and only exists at the one single point where the water turns around from rising to begin its fall again, somewhere around Arch D.

Finding this chart has made me reconsider all I knew about tides. I am definitely looking forward to everyones response and thoughts to this topic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Does no one know whats up with this graph? Is it indeed diagramming a minor low tide? I know one thing, if no one on here knows, I will definitely have a better idea of what it means after tomorrow. I have my phones alarm set to go off at low tide, high tide and the minor low tide so I dont miss them. ;)
 
G

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Well I just talked to one of my friends and she said that a minor low tide is a tide that is just a little bigger than the low tide itself. I has little to no affect on the river itself. You will more than likely not even notice it because it doesn't last all that long. She said it may last 10 to 30 minutes, give and take a few minutes.


She said by the time you think you realize it, its over. LOL

I didn't find much on the net. :dunno:

Are you going to fish low tide or the high tide??
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Texas Bass Pro said:
Are you going to fish low tide or the high tide??
Im gonna be fishing both. When Iget there it will be going out. MAjority of my day it will be rising then high tide.
 
G

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If you start out catching good fish on Low Tide are you going to stay with it? Vice Versus. Is this just for practice and fun fishing?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Texas Bass Pro said:
If you start out catching good fish on Low Tide are you going to stay with it? Vice Versus. Is this just for practice and fun fishing?
It only lasts so long. We will fish from roughly 7am until 4pm - 9 hours. In those 9 hours the tide will change whether we like it or not. It will be going out and causing the rivers water level to drop when we get there. Then a couple hours later it will stall out and the river will be at its lowest level. Then the tide will start to come in again and the rivers water level will begin to rise. It will rise about 3 feet and then stall out again. That will be the high tide. Once it hits high tide it will slightly turn around and the water level will drop a half foot then rise a half foot then stall out again, still remaining at high tide, then it will start to go out again, dropping the level of the river until its back to low tide.
Our tournament will end on the high tide though and we will never see the 2nd outgoing or low tide tomorrow.
IN order to do the best you can, you must fish each tide as effectively as possible. When the tide is going out I will be looking for fish near current breaking cover/structure that is in the main river as the fish will have pulled out to that to take advantage of the forage being washed out of the ditches, creeks, rice fields, vegetation etc... Thats the easiest tide to fish.
When the tide turns around and starts to come in (water level rising) you have to follow the tide in because the fish will do the same. In this situation its probably going to be best if you find ditches that run through large flats, as those ditches will act as highways for the bass and more than likely during the falling tide the fish followed the same ditch to the main river channel so therefore they will be following it in. Thats still not the worst tide to fish. However once the tide is high and theriver is no longer rising, that is where the fishing gets tricky. Now the fish can be anywhere. Knowing where the ditches are that they followed in on the rising tide helps but from that point they can spread out far and wide. Sadly most of my day will be under those conditions... high tide, water not rising or falling. I have some plans but I didnt get to excercise them during my pre-fishing last weekend. I'm hoping some of the lessons I learned on Rondout Creek and the Hudson River up in NY way back in the 90s with my old club will help me out tomorrow. I guess we will see.

and yeah.. I should be asleep but... as typical of any Basshole, I just cant not calm down enough to fall asleep lol
 
G

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I didn't realize that this was a tournament. Good luck. I have a friend that fishes a river for quite some time and he loves to fish the low tide. He will wait at just the right moment for the low tide to take affect and follow the tide as far as possible until time runs out. He said that it can be some tuff fishing though I have never tried it myself. He said you would be surprised on how the fish react to the tide change and how they position themselves.

Once again, Good luck. I hope you catch them all.
 

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The actual rise and fall of tidal water is tied directly to normal river current. Watching a shoreline tide you see the tide ebb and flow in spurts, not like a tsunami. It pushes farther upstream as it flows inland. When that brief ebb occurs normal river flow adds to the force going back out, effectively dropping the rise a few inches. That outflow is met by a last surge of incoming tide flow, raising the total height a few inches before falling a foot at low tide. When that happens river flow is maximum, unhindered by the tide. Understand, a tide can't hold a river back very long. The river will always fight it. It's a little complicated. If could find the matching river flow chart it would make a lot more sense why that B dip is there. :wack:

Jim
 
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