Bass Fishing Forums - The Bassholes banner
1 - 20 of 39 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,987 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Before the drop shot technique became popular, spit shot was the money winner out west during the 80's. Before that time the Texas and Carolina rigs were the top presentations. The split shot required a heavy round spit shot crimped onto the line. To prevent flattening the line, you crimped the shot on just tight enough to keep in place, then pulled a length of line through the shot, making a groove. You clipped off the line pulled through the weight that had any flatten spots, pulled out about 18" of line and tied the hook. I never liked this rig and simply used a small round split shot to stop a bullet weight, similar to the C-rig. Then the mojo tubular weights came out and switch to those.
Today the slip shot rig is used by most western pros, however with up dated components. Top Brass Pro-Jo weights, Glass beads and Peg-It II are the key parts.
Spinning you use the same 6 to 8 Lb fluorocarbon line and rods as drop shot, 1/8 oz Pro-Jo weight, 8mm glass bead, Peg-It II and the Owner down shot off set hook size 1/0.You Peg the glass bead for a weight stopper. Worms are 4 1/2 to 6" straight or curl tail finesse style.The Top Brass weights keep the holes from closing, like lead does and their glass has very smooth edges.
Casting; you can use your Texas worm rod, 10 to 14 lb fluorocarbon line, 1/4 oz Pro-Jo weight, 8mm glass bead, Peg-It II, Owner or Gamakstsu 2/0 or 3/0 off set light wire worm hook. Use 7" worms or 4 to 5 " creature baits is the hot set up the last 2 years.
Peg the glass bead 18 to 36 inches, use the shorter length for creatures and longer for worms depending on the cover.
The bite is a pressure feel as the bass tends to simply follow the worm and suck it in. You don't feel much until the bass turns, when you feel a tap or slight pressure, reel set and sweep the rod back to take up the slack line.
This is the ideal companion to drop shotting and covers more water faster fished parallel or slightly and down hill on points and breaklines. The spinning rig catches numbers of 2 to 3 lbs and casting rig kickers over 3 lbs.
Tom
Ps; I use black weights and beads; 1/8 and 1/4 oz with 8mm beads, with this rig. When Texas rigged and shaking worms, I used a bead color that matches the worm.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,987 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
One of closest kept secrets by pro's today is fishing this rig with bait casting tackle and using creatures Innovations Beavers, Yamamoto's Kreature or hula grubs on 3/0 off set hook. Last yest several major tournaments were won on this set up. IT IS NOT A CAROLINA RIG!!!, it's much better.
Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,082 Posts
To be honest Tom, I like to try things before I can intelligibly respond especially to stuff I know nothing about. I'm froze in right now. I think I've been crying about it for 38 days to be exact. As a matter of fact I supposed to be fishing a tourney right now but can't because of the Ice. The weather is supposed to break tommorrow.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
539 Posts
I am there with Drew, I read all your stuff and file it away for future reference. I will give it a try and if questions come up and I am sure they will I will ask then. Do not ever think we do not appreciate your post and the knowledge you experience you impart to us. Keep it comming. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
Thanks for the tip. Naturally, I copied it and it is in my special, top secret, killa, bassholes file, which is hermedically sealed and in a bank vault in Russellville, protected by the FBI, CIA and NAS ;D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
I use this rig quite often and simply refer to it as a finesse carolina rig. This rig was deadly for post spawn smallies in my area last year, rigged with a light brass bullet sinker,glass bead and a small senko or fluke. It worked well on the largemouth also. Dragging it slowly along the bottom and shaking it when contacting stumps and other cover was responsible for more fish than I could keep track of.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
635 Posts
This is a rig I have been expirementing with the past few months. I have had a few bites on it, but here is my question. I usually use this rig like a C-Rig, but have had hits anywhere from deadsticking to reeling it in fast to get the net. What is the best presentation for these rigs?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
222 Posts
I am really confused at how this rig looks. Is it just a weight with a beed that is pegged up on the line so that the weight can slide up and down? Do you use a swivel with a leader as well?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
I typically use the slipshot rig with a pegged bead and no leader or swivel. Sometimes I will peg a bead above and below a small brass bullet weight trapping the weight between them so as to get a great sound when shaking the rig. Many times I will just peg a bullet weight or mojo weight about 18 in. up the line without a bead. Most of my retrieves are just a slow drag and either deadsticking or shaking the bait when I come in contact with cover. The long slender mojo weights are great for pulling thru weeds without getting hung up.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,987 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The Top Brass Pro-jo weight is the same shape as the lead Mojo weight, a cylinder shape with round ends. Using a bullet weight works, however tends to wedge between rocks and slips over obstacles easily. The rounded end weights tend to bump into obstacles and do not wedge between rocks as often. Bumping into obstacles creates movement to the soft plastic worm or creature following behind the weight, without the angler needing to impart action. You can focus on what is going on down there without moving the rod tip up and down, therefor you are ready for strikes and miss fewer. lead weight work, brass works better because the hole stay open, the glass bead clicks against the brass weight and you feel things better.
One knot at the hook, peg the glass bead with the rubber Peg-It II below the weight. The Carolina rig requires 3 knots, a swivel, a bead and the weight. The leader length is usually between 18 to 30 inches with the slip shot, light line and standard rods, where as the C rig uses heavier weights and line, longer leader usually over 36", requiring a 7' or longer rod to cast effectively. The longer leader and 3 knots looses contact with the trailing worm or creature. Small details that can add up to a big difference.

Tom


Tom
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,224 Posts
After reading that a few times I concluded the Top Brass Pro-Jo is used the same as the Mojo, only it's brass and supposedly gets over weeds and rocks easier than denser lead. I'll try it this year, but I still have a supply of Mojo weights and titanium hook/line threader I use to pull rubber bands through. Once it's pegged and can be slid up or down line with a tug I sometimes thread on a couple of beads before tying on a hook. Due to the light weight of the sinker I can use glass beads without a breakage problem.

It's been a good winter rig in shallow water around long points, sort of a search bait that sometimes turns out to be the best choice. I can hurry it along and find biting bass or finesse it. I go to it when a drop shot or split shot rig just doesn't cover enough water fast enough, but I don't want a regular T-rig sinker.

Jim
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,987 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ouachita said:
After reading that a few times I concluded the Top Brass Pro-Jo is used the same as the Mojo, only it's brass and supposedly gets over weeds and rocks easier than denser lead. I'll try it this year, but I still have a supply of Mojo weights and titanium hook/line threader I use to pull rubber bands through. Once it's pegged and can be slid up or down line with a tug I sometimes thread on a couple of beads before tying on a hook. Due to the light weight of the sinker I can use glass beads without a breakage problem.

It's been a good winter rig in shallow water around long points, sort of a search bait that sometimes turns out to be the best choice. I can hurry it along and find biting bass or finesse it. I go to it when a drop shot or split shot rig just doesn't cover enough water fast enough, but I don't want a regular T-rig sinker.

Jim
The Peg-It II rubber nails don't require a tool, if have the rubber strands and tool, use them. I use the heavier 1/4 oz Pro-Jo in water down to 40', the Top Brass glass beads are tough and have smooth edges. Lead weight work OK, the main issue is the holes close down and require reaming with a hook point to get the line through, plus the line drags more and you have better feel with the smooth larger hole diameter in the brass. My favorite rig with this is using Yamamoto's 5" twin tail hula grub, cinnamon/black/purple flake
on 3/0 EWG hook. I use the Peg-It rubber cut off strand and pull it through the hook eye, cut off the ends about 1/8 inch on both sides of the hook, them pull the grub over the hook eye to keep from sliding down. This rig is deadly on quality size bass, fished the same exact manner as illustrate in the Horizontal Jig article. Give it a try when the crawdads get active.
Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
635 Posts
My favorite rig with this is using Yamamoto's 5" twin tail hula grub, cinnamon/black/purple flake
on 3/0 EWG hook. - Quote from Old School.
I always knew these things had to be good on a c-rig, but couldn't get bit that way. I'll have to give this a try. ;)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,987 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
hi steel basser said:
My favorite rig with this is using Yamamoto's 5" twin tail hula grub, cinnamon/black/purple flake
on 3/0 EWG hook. - Quote from Old School.
I always knew these things had to be good on a c-rig, but couldn't get bit that way. I'll have to give this a try. ;)
Try to keep the length between the weight and grub between 14" to 20" and fish rocky banks or clay to rocky breaks where crawdads tend to hang out and places shad or minnows feed around. This is not a good grass or weed presentation technique, unless the weeds are sparse.
Tom
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,987 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thought I would revisit this topic and talk about slip shotting in a little different prospective, learning to bass fish.
I mentioned in the " little white worms" thread that I had taken out my friend BO who is 72 years young. Bo is a big man who lost weight to get down to 300 lbs., so he is not the most agile person in a bass boat. In fact Bo has never been in a bass boat or fished since he was a kid back in Arkansas.
When I gave him a spinning rod rigged with a little 4 1/2" worm on 6 lb with 1/8 oz. weight, Bo was very surprised. He remembered fishing with his dad and using pistol grip rod with Zebco reel, casting lures for bass and thought thats how you bass fish. Bo actually went out and bought a new push buttom reel and rod combo, a few lures from Walmart for this trip.
We started out with the Zebco outfit while I fished jigs for awhile, then handed BO the sissy outfit, mostly for self defense as Bo wasn't practiced at casting and I was spending more time retrieving snagged lures than fishing.
Moved outside on a point and Bo caught his first bass on the slip shot rig in about 2 minutes. We enjoyed a very good bite on school size bass the rest of the morning.
My point is slip shotting is the ideal beginner bass fisherman rig. You spend more time fishing at the depth the bass are using and catching bass. Catching bass is important to every bass fisherman and especially import to youngsters of all ages that are learning to fish. If a beginner can catch bass with the slip shot rig and down shot rig, why don't experienced bass fisherman use it? One reason is it requires a spinning outfit forthe light weight version finesse presentation. You can also go with the heavier bait casting version. This is the best presentation a back seater in a tournament can use when the "pro" is working the shoreline and moving the boat. Just cast out and let the boat drag it along until you see someting to recast to. The "pro" won't mind netting your fish along the way.
Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
I wish someone could put a picture of this rig on the thread. I'm havein trouble pictureing how to rig it. :dunno:
Pegleg
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,987 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Pegleg said:
I wish someone could put a picture of this rig on the thread. I'm havein trouble pictureing how to rig it. :dunno:
Pegleg
E mailed you a sketch and c/c Jared to be posted.
Tom
 
G

·
I will give this a try tis weekend Tom. I have used split shot rigs many times but never a slip shot rig. I have Carolina Keepers and I like those so I will use that to peg the weight rather then the bead with the peg it which I don't have. Got beads but no peg it's.

In the Farm 13/Stick Marsh there are ditches that are in 4 feet of water that run north and south and in the ditch it is 6 feet deep with berms on either side of the ditch that rise up to 2 feet. I caught 2 bass in there last weekend on a lipless crankbait. It was so windy it was hard to do much else. I think I am going to anchor around this structure this weekend and will give this rig a shot there.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,987 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Keith, You can use the glass bead between the weight and keeper for the sound. Try the Hula grub with 3/0 off set hook, 1/4 oz weight rig, looks like a school of bait fish and the bass love it this time of year.
Tom
 
1 - 20 of 39 Posts
Top