Bass Fishing Forums - The Bassholes banner
1 - 20 of 78 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,987 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Pre-Spawn is my favorite seasonal period because it is the time when a catch of a lifetime can occur. Following the cold water period of late winter, pre-spawn begins when the water temperate approaches 55 degrees down to the depth of light. The female bass leave their deep sanctuaries and stage near structure breaks, that holds baitfish and clay or rocky soil where crawdads are coming out of hibernation, located close to the spawning flats. Wood cover like trees or brush on deep break lines is ideal if that type of cover is available.
The big bass are hungry and feeding to get ready for the spawn. These bass are usually in small groups or 5 to 15 fish and stay in the staging area for a few weeks or until the water warms to 58 to 60 degrees, then begin to cruise the spawning flats. Depending on the depth of light the big bass will stay a few feet above good light pentration and are establishing the territory they plan to spawn in.
The primary prey source for these big bass are emerging crawdads and baitfish. The presentations that trigger these bass are reaction baits that look like the prey fish or jigs and creature baits that mimic crawdads. Swim baits, spinner baits, crank baits, plastic worms  and jigs. The emerging crawdads are green/brown in color, the baitfish will be predominately light color due to the colder water and your lures should be in those hues. It is a little early for salamanders or waterdogs to be a food source factor, however big bass will eat them if available and kill them on sight during the spawn. Bluegill and crappie are also a good baitfish during this time. Eels are a cold water food source and the darker color plastic worms and jig trailers work well.
On larger reservoirs the deeper water zones tend to warm later than the protected flats near deep water points or channels. Therefore you can follow the pre-spawn from the north west wind protected areas to the more wind prone areas and extend the pre-spawn period without targeting spawner's.
Smallmouth and spots tend to spawn at 58 to 62 degrees, where largemouth tend to spawn at 62 to 65 degrees. The bigger bass may spawn deeper down to 15 feet if the water clarity is very good or 6 to 2  feet in off color water. The smaller bass tend to be up in 1 to 3 feet. Clay with gravel/sand near wood / brush or tulle's is preferred for largemouth and rock/gravel for spots and smallmouth.
Tom
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,987 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
There appears to be very little interest in this type of information on this board. This takes lots of time to post all the calendar periods and with no interest, why continue the effort.
Tom
 
G

·
My guess would be because people are more interested in cold water winter bass right now. Come pre-spawn I bet people will start asking the questions you have already answerd.

Great info tho!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,987 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
imonembad said:
I'm guessing people who want information will ask for it.
I have decided to post the "Winter cold water period" as it may be appropriate for the majority of bass fisherman on this board at this time. Sometimes it is difficult to ask a question that you do not already have a answer for and just looking for support. I do not have all the answers and that is the purpose of this type of forum, to get everyone involved. You do not need to believe in what I post to ask a question about it. It may also seem like I'm from mars because of some of my opinions and view points differ from the mainstream. We all have different opinions and sharing experiences can be applied as you see fit. After this post, I will take your advice and try to answer questions that are posted.
Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
635 Posts
oldschool said:
There appears to be very little interest in this type of information on this board. This takes lots of time to post all the calendar periods and with no interest, why continue the effort.
Tom
Old School, you post any dan thing you want to. ;) Even when I don't post a response, I learn at least a little bit. My confidence lures in pre-spawn are jerkbaits, from hard to soft as the water warms. Jigs are for the frequent cold fronts in early spring, and spinnerbaits are best around wood on the warmer days. I am planning to try my lobina lure swimbait in the same areas as the spinner this spring, and the drop shot on days where the jerkbait bite is slow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
Old School, you keep postin' this stuff becaus there are a bunch of folks like me who are trying to absorb as much info as possible because we're rookies !! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,390 Posts
Tom I personally take everything you say and try to learn something or apply something new to me. I even printed all of your long posts on the insider board you got your own folder labled TY so keep the info coming! but i can see where not getting any responses could be frustrating so bear with us! Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,082 Posts
Tom, lets get this straight I enjoy your posts also. I was merly stating that the reason that people maybe aren't responding is because when your done there ain't much left to cover. I by no means meant that no one was paying attention to your posts. I'm interested in applying the big swim baits to the midwest lakes and would love to pick your brain at some point when it rolls up in your agenda.  Drew I just got to the bass are bass post thanks for the insight on swim baits. How much research hass been done on the midwest with these baits?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,224 Posts
I've hopped all over the internet, belonging to at least 20 fishing forums this year alone, looking for folks who want to discuss fishing technically. Mostly what I found was about 99% idle chit chat, people just bored and wanting to talk to someone about anything. Their cat is constipated. The truck is using too much oil. Many find their local buds online and they sit and talk all night. Many are in a race to see who hits 20,000 posts first, each post a one-liner saying something like "Bump", the topic the latest NFL brawl. "He's just a thug." That counts as one post.

What I'm very certain of is there are mostly 5 types of forum members. The first group is the "talkers", about anything under the sun, who might be willing to say something once a day about fishing. They are too involved in too many sports to devote much effort to fish talk. They fish occasionally, but if you check the times and dates of posts, they fish rarely.

The next are the "lurkers", the majority of membership not knowing enough about fishing to write about it, but learning what they've needed daily. The main thing is they are there, gobling up all the knowledge they can find. Most of them have never once posted anything. You can check the membership pages and see that. Zero posts.

Another is the "teachers" who know enough to write articles about fishing, who have a ton of fishing experience. Those might fill 3% of the membership. They don't hesitate to teach and answer questions. It's that way in any organization. In churches 20% of the people are involved, 10% doing the work of the opther 90%. BUT, they have a "calling" to do the work without regret or disappointment. They just keep plugging. Of that group maybe 90% wait to answer or contribute when opportunity arises. The other 10% of this group actually initiate activity, stimulating the activities. 

One group, in the great minority, are those who are actively improving their fishing and willing to actually post a question. We really love seeing those posts, as they will learn something, and those who answer are bound to solidify what they know by collecting their thoughts. Many times I've been fishing and thinkling about a tip I posted, then use it and begin catching. If I had not written about it lately I might not have remembered it.

Then there are those, the least in number, knowing enough they shouldn't have to be a member anywhere, but wanting to just keep up with trends, making sure bass fishing knowledge is going forth, what people think, mostly the staff folks doing a lot of work behind the scenes, keeping the e-machinery going, finding ways to pay the forum bills, finding sponsors, being diplomats, moderating, with no time to be directly involved.

Tom and I found on our last forum in common people that do ask questions ask the same ones asked 50 times already. They get answered and we begin directing them to the search tool, only to lose everything and start over. At least here it's still here, and we have a pleasant forum sponsor that is easy to live with, who responds personally. There is no offensive stuff going on unfit for children.  And we are only a few months old.

I just post as though the whole world is eager to read it and have quit worrying about responses. I know people are absorbing what I was privilege to learn and enjoy over the past 4 1/2 decades. I don't have a son or daughters carrying on my sport, so I'm determined to pass it on to those taking time to visit here.

Lastly, I'm in the habit that if a topic is covered, I pass on to the next. Tom is presenting excellent knowledge and I find it difficult to add to that knowledge base. I'm gonna tell off on Tom. Fortunately for me he sometimes doesn't address the actual question  :D That allows me the chance to answer it, AND enjoy the lessons he types out. So if I don't add in it's because he's handling it.

Here's the way I've always looked at learning. If I learn all you know and you don't know all I know, that makes me smarter than you. Sounds a little selfish, yes. Unselfishness is to divulge YOUR stuff to even us all out. When first taking college calculus I never asked questions. Bad mistake. I THOUGHT or HOPED I was understanding. So I ended up flunking the course and having to repeat it. Why didn't I ask questions the first time thorough? Obviously I didn't know enough to ask a question. That fits a number of readers here. But eventually it will all click and they'll begin to add in.

Jim
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,987 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Jim, thank you for your support! As you are well aware, not everyone has had the opportunity to fish for a life time or even live this long! There are few secrets, everything has been done before just not shared openly.
Tom
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,224 Posts
Tom, I admire your enthusiasm.

It's true there are no fishing secrets, but there is a lack of knowledge that until learned remains a mystery to many. I fish a lot of antique lures because I still like them andthey produce. The techniques and presentations have not changed, few improvements possible. It all boils down to locating fish, getting a lure down to them,  detecting a bite, setting the hook, and getting them in the boat. Maybe the largest change is fish handling techniques. In the old days the fish were kept for fish fries, catch & release unthinkable.

The earliest bassers grew up first catching panfish on a litle bream hook and worm or insect. It taught us how quickly a fish can sample an offering then eat it or reject it. Folks that learned how to keep fish from stealing baits became the best anglers. They developed that touch needed to do well. I still think a basser needs to relax occasionally and still-fish for bream just to sharpen reflexes, especially when it's been a long time since last fishing.

The pre-spawn isn't far off and it's time to think about it. We needed to be talking winter fishing back mid fall so all could digest the information and get set up with winter lures. It's important to keep that sensitivity edge. I hear year after year at the pre-spawn "I get many bites but just can't connect". Practice now. Plan now. Get those pre-spawn lures in prime condition, top quality hooks ultra sharp, just the right rod, reel, line. Fill the bathtub and get very familiar with how the lures swim. It's a great way to pass winter. The best setup I've seen is a clear plastic tank in a baitshop allowing you to try a lure before buying. A swimming pool is nice, but it's hard to really se what a lure is doing in there. I want to know exactly what a lure does when sitting still, twitched, jerked. That tank was perfect with a clerk fishing and observers studying. A bass club project with merit would be to build one that remains available to anyone. 3 sheets are needed for a tank 8' long, 2' X 2'. 1/4" thick is $170 each, 1/2" is $314. A glass shop can order and pre-cut and bevel edges for you. All you need is at places like http://www.professionalplastics.com...prname=ACRYLIC-SHEETS---EXTRUDED---Plexiglass

When it gets scratched up there are buffing/polishing kits.

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Great points Jim. I am one of those guys who likes to read and learn everything I can and then apply it to my fishing.
The knowledge that you and Tom have provided is invaluable and greatly appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
Jim and Tom, keep the info comming. I am making notes, copies and anything else I can do to become better at this sport I love so much. I read Jim's old post on electronics last week and it really has helped me understand what I'm seeing. To be honest, I had no idea of how to use the darn thing and by the time I get to go again, I will have studied it until I can actually use it to catch more fish. The resources on this site, as well as the friendly chit chat is why this site is #1 in my book ! Teach on brothers, its appreciated.

Gary
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,987 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
OTTER said:
Jim and Tom, keep the info comming.  I am making notes, copies and anything else I can do to become better at this sport I love so much.  I read Jim's old post on electronics last week and it really has helped me understand what I'm seeing.  To be honest, I had no idea of how to use the darn thing and by the time I get to go again, I will have studied it until I can actually use it to catch more fish.  The resources on this site, as well as the friendly chit chat is why this site is #1 in my book !  Teach on brothers, its appreciated.

Gary
Take a look at Don Iovino's book: http;//www.iovino.com/donbook.htm
I keep a copy in my boat to help remember all the little tricks with GPS/sonar.
Merry Christmas or holidays to you and have a great new year fishing.
Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
hey new to this sight and seems like a good one but if anybody could help me with a problem that I have and that is locating bass consistently anyway on my home river system and when I say river I mean river 50 feet wide and good current some small shallow bayous spaced out with laydowns all up and down the banks I do a lot of fishing there and catch some nice fish but don't understand the patterns and movements of these river bass with every spot looking good and the river bottom being pretty much the same (mud and flat) what do they do during cold fronts,High pressure,warm water,low water (5 feet normal depth),high watersunny,cloudy ect,, all info would be helpfull thank you ps .spring summer and fall patterns would be helpfull also
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,224 Posts
Moved to RIVERS
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,987 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
rick said:
hey new to this sight and seems like a good one but if anybody could help me with a problem that I have and that is locating bass consistently anyway on my home river system and when I say river I mean river 50 feet wide and good current some small shallow bayous spaced out with laydowns all up and down the banks I do a lot of fishing there and catch some nice fish but don't understand the patterns and movements of these river bass with every spot looking good and the river bottom being pretty much the same (mud and flat) what do they do during cold fronts,High pressure,warm water,low water (5 feet normal depth),high watersunny,cloudy ect,, all info would be helpfull   thank you 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       ps .spring summer and fall patterns would be helpfull also                                                                                                   
Jim's reply is very good information as usual. My experience with rivers is limited. In-Fisherman published a very detailed report on rivers and I can copy the sections applying to bass and send it via email if you post your address to the message board, as soon as I get a chance to locate it. What type of bass are you targeting; Smallmouth, Spots or Largemouth? Largemouth tend to seek slower moving current, wing dam breaks, oxbow lakes and heavy cover. Spots and smallies tend to be more active in the current, holding on objects that provide breaks, similar to how trout sets up to ambush prey that the current brings to them. Water temperature still governs the basses life cycle in the river and they stage near spawning areas, just in smaller more compact areas where the current or sudden depth changes does not affect the nest sites. Weather conditions are more dramatic to river bass as storms change their ecosystem, water clarity, water levels, current speed etc. Ambush sites are he primary holding and feeding zones for river bass, therefore light conditions are very important to help camouflage the bass. Low light is better than bright light and following a cold front the light is most intense, so the bass will position themselves in the darkest ambush sites available. Prey is crawdads and smaller baitfish then you would see in a lake or reservoir and reaction bites are faster because the strike zone is reduced as the bass generally stay close to cover. Down size the lures and use baits like, buzzers,spinners, spinner baits, jigs,Texas rigged worms, crank baits that tend to look like crawdads or darker color baitfish.
Tom
 
1 - 20 of 78 Posts
Top