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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
An old castle dating back to 1157
The castle is not far from where my dad used to live, about 800yards or so,
Hylton Castle was originally an 11th century fortified manor house, founded by Henry Hilton. Between 1374 and 1420, Sir William Hilton founded the stone castle, when adding a four storey keep-gatehouse and a chapel. Adorning the façades of the keep, is a fine display of medieval heraldic shields, with the altered chapel of St Catherine, replacing earlier chapels, which date from 1157. In 18th century, Baron John Hylton and his son



A little of the castles history.
Like most ancient castles, gatehouses and manor houses, Hylton Castle has its own ghost, but the origin of this apparition known as the ‘Cauld Lad’ could be in doubt and of questionable authority.

There are at least three legends explaining the ghostly apparition.

One was that a young retainer was discovered by the young heiress’s father courting his daughter and was slain.

However, the local historians favour an occurrence that was said to have come about in the year 1609.

It would appear that the Lord of Hylton had given orders that his horse be prepared by a certain time in order that he could make an important journey. Angered by the delay he visited the stable and found the stable boy still asleep. The furious Lord drew his sword and decapitated Roger Skelton, the youth in question. To hide his crime he threw the corpse into a pond and put about a story to cover up what he had done.

When the remains were discovered he was tried and acquitted of murder. The Coroner’s report from the Chester Ward at Hylton on the 3rd July 1609 showed that witnesses supported Robert Hylton of Hylton, described as a Gentleman, when he swore that whilst using a scythe during mowing he accidentally struck Roger Skelton with the point of the scythe on his right thigh, causing a mortal wound one inch long and two inches broad from which the youth died within the hour. It is also on record that a free pardon was granted for this ‘manslaughter’ by Bishop William Jameson on the 6th September 1609

Thus the legend of the ’Cauld Lad’ began

The title ‘Cauld Lad’ has different connotations. The word cauld is believed by many to mean cold and is taken from the local dialect word which is pronounced cowed. This would relate to the belief that the appearance of the ghost was always preceded by a cold damp wind. It could also be the spelling of cowed which is also a dialect word, meaning a steer with its horns removed, but when referring to a human, means headless, which the Cauld Lad certainly was.

Somewhere along the way the ghost of Roger Skelton became entwined with the ‘Brownies’ who were invisible and good-natured spirits, usually found in country dwellings such as farmhouses and are said to have originated from Scottish legends. It is during the night that they make themselves known by completing tasks that would please the owners, especially in the kitchen, but do not like to be seen doing this. Should any attempt be made to reward them with money or clothes, especially green, it would result in them leaving and never returning.

The Cauld Lad possessed some of the characteristics of a brownie, but should the kitchen be left in good order with all pots and pans cleaned and put away, he would become annoyed at having no work to do and throw all the utensils around the kitchen.

The castle building was not the only place to be haunted by the mischevious ghost, for on occasions the Cauld Lad is known to have impersonated the boatman on the Hylton Ferry, where after accepting the fares he would leave his passengers stranded in the centre of the river

Eventually some of the servants decided they had had enough of his pranks and in order to get rid of him made a green cloak and hood. When they were finished they laid these by the fire in the great kitchen and on the stroke of midnight the ghost (or brownie) could be heard weeping as he wrapped the cloak around him and crying:-

“Here’s a cloak and here’s a hood
the Cauld Lad of Hylton will do no more good”.

Although the brownie part of the Cauld Lad never returned to rearrange the kitchen and play pranks, his ghost could be heard long after.

Even up to the start of the twentieth century it was said that people passing the castle would claim to hear the unearthly cries of the ghost known as the Cauld Lad

 

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Man thats just gotta be awe inspiring to wander through a "building" that has been standing for 4 centuries or more! To think of all that has happened in a place like that as you wander it's halls imagining all who have walked the same path as you. Astonishing!
 

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Man o man I love Historic places. Im glad places like that didnt get destroyed during WWII.
 

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Fish4FunInFl said:
Im glad places like that didnt get destroyed during WWII.
True! I agree
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sorry a date check it dates back to 1157.

When i was just a youngster my friends used to "dare" each other to stay in the dungeons for as long as we could LoL, I can tell you it WAS scary LoL.
The dungeons have since been gated off, heavy steel gates with big padlocks
 

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andy said:
Sorry a date check it dates back to 1157.
Wow!

Imagine what went on in those dungeons?? I can see how that would be creepy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Rodney come on over and spend the night in the castle mate ;)


This is Lumley Castle. It is over 600 years old, its about 3 miles from where i live. Its now used as a hotel




Lumley Castle

Everyone who has lived in Chester-le-Street is no doubt familiar with Lumley Castle. Situated just to the east of the River Wear and standing on sloping parkland it gives the appearance of a fortified mansion house. Typical of a number of 14th century English castles it exemplifies the change from fortresses to domestic houses. As the Scots, during the 14th century, still continued to attack north-east England the castle was constructed to withstand possible attack. A similar castle can be seen at Castle Bolton in Wensleydale in Yorkshire although Lumley appears to have withstood the ravages of time much better.
The original structure has been altered during the mid 18th century by the famous architect Sir John Vanbrugh. Vanbrugh is also noted for the restoration and alteration of both Castle Howard and Blenheim Palace. Lumley castle was altered on the instructions of the Second Earl of Scarborough whose family owned the castle at that time.
The castle has been owned by the Lumley family since the middle years of the 14th century. The most noteworthy of the early Lumleys was Ralph Lumley who became head of the family in 1374. He enjoyed greater wealth than previous Lumleys due to inheritance from his maternal ancestors. Ralph was a true English nobleman who distinguished himself in wars against both the Scots and the French. He was captured by the Scots at the Battle of Otterburn and was forced to pay a ransom to regain his freedom. Assistance with the ransom payment came from King Richard II who in 1392 appointed him Captain of the disputed border town of Berwick.
His friendship and loyalty for Richard II brought about his downfall and ultimate death. Richard II was deposed in 1399 by Henry of Lancaster who became Henry IV . Ralph was one of a number of close followers who tried to reinstate Richard on the throne and in January 1400 he was captured by a mob faithful to Henry in Cirencester and executed.
The Lumley lands were confiscated only to be re-instated in 1405 to Ralph’s son John. The Lumleys are also Earls of Scarborough, this being down to the efforts of Richard , Viscount Lumley who in 1690 was created Earl of Scarborough for his assistance to William of Orange when he became king. The present Earl of Scarborough lives at Sanbeck Hall near Rotherham.
In recent years the castle has served as a location for lodgings for Durham University students and to date it is leased to a hotel company and is both a luxury hotel and a conference centre. It also has a reputation as a venue for medieval banquets. In spite of the change of use, the structure of the building is largely untouched,

As with any historic location, Lumley Castle has its resident ghost. Lady Lily Lumley, the wife of Sir Ralph is said to walk the corridors of her former home where she was murdered by local priests and her body dumped in the well, which you can still see today.

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Your welcome.

Below

This place is just a couple of miles from me, Its the first Church in England to have GLASS WINDOWS


The Anglo-Saxon church of St Peter's at Monkwearmouth is one of the UK's first stone built churches. Built in 674AD, the tower and west wall are original Saxon features and the church also has on display fragments of the oldest stained glass in the country, made by 7th Century European craftsmen. Together with its twin monastery, St Paul's in Jarrow, St Peter's has been short-listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site.

 

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Andy, you buy, I will fly !!! :thumbup01:

I will spend the night in there, no problem :D ;)
 

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Neat stuff, I love history and especially the diveration of words as explained in the first article.

Yep, I will spend the night in the dingeon with Fish4, it ain't the dead I fear, besides I think I can out run Fish4
 
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