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All the fishhook manufacturers have registered trade names. For example, Wright & McGill Co. has EAGLE CLAW, KAHLE, SEA GUARD, etc. These trade names include different finishes, but the one that is most confusing is registered style names. Registered style trade names become terminologies that really pertain to that particular brand.
For example, the Wright & McGill Co., manufacturer of Eagle Claw hooks, has the kahle name trade marked. Along comes Mustad who’s making their version of the same style, called a wide gap hook. To really confuse the issue, Wright & McGill has a totally different hook they call a wide gap. To add fuel to the fire, about 10 years ago the new flippin’ jig hook came out and everyone called them a wide gap. Now we have worm hooks and treble hooks called wide gap and extra wide gap.
We now have a company with the blood red treble hooks. Most consumers believe this to be a new product on the market. They have been around for more than a dozen years. I recall using my first red hook in 1990 on a strawberry kiwi worm. I also had the red trebles I used on small crank baits.
Because these trade names add a degree of difficulty when ordering different brands of the same style, I recommend you know the style number of the hooks you need to insure you get what you want. It will make things easier for all concerned and will probably save you money.

Capt. Hook

The Circle Hook Field Test

Most people who see a circle hook for the first time swear there is no way to catch a fish on that hook. I have to admit I was one of those people.
About 5 years ago, there were many articles about circle hooks and a lot of our customers started asking questions about them that I had no answer for. So I decided to do some serious field-testing. (Dirty job but someone has to do it) I got with a good friend who had done a lot of trot line fishing and after much discussion, arm twisting, and laughter on his part, I talked him into helping with my field test project.
We started with 30 hooks; 10 each of 7/0 kahle hooks, straight shank stainless steel 7/0 hooks (most people’s preferred hook and an excellent live bait hook), and finally the 13/0 circle hooks. After 3 weeks of very accurate record keeping, we found that 39% of the time the bait was gone on the straight shank hook we had a fish. (Blamed the other 61% on turtles) The kahle hook had a marked improvement. The turtles only got 53% of the baits. The circle hooks had an amazing average of 87% of the time our bait was gone we had a fish. (Turtles only got 13%) During the 3-week period we had caught right at 1000 pounds of catfish. We were really proud of our accomplishment.
To make this story a little longer, almost 1 year to the date of our field test, our church wanted to have a big fish fry and of course the pastor called on my field test partner and me. The pressure was on. We set our lines with 30 circle hooks. At the end of 3 weeks, we had caught 2878 pounds of catfish. I guarantee we had more than 1 fish fry. Yes, My partner and I are true believers in the catch-ability of the circle hook.

Capt. Hook

Gold vs. Bronze

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Most fishermen believe gold jig hooks are stronger than bronze or visa-versa. I’ve heard the same pros and cons for each finish, no matter what brand name.
Now let me tell you how most companies build their crappie jig hooks
Company X knows they have to have 500,000 each of gold and bronze hooks. These hooks all start from the same spool of wire going through the hook machine. The eye is formed first, then the shape (aberdeen, o’shaughnessy, etc.). The point is last to be made. They produce all 1,000,000 hooks at the same time. The next step is the tempering process. The manufacturers try to temper them as close as they can to the same hardness. Then they move on down the line where the hooks are plated. 5000,000 are plated bronze, and 500,000 are plated gold. The plating is the last step before the hooks are boxed for shipment.
It’s the tempering process that makes the difference in strength, not the plating. Tempering 1,000,000 hooks exactly the same is impossible, or at least, cost prohibitive.
So pick the color of jig hook because you have the confidence that’s what produces best for you.

Capt. Hook

Forged –vs- Tempered

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Forged – will break before it will bend
Tempered – will give or straighten out before they break.


Examples Of Sometimes Confusing Terminology

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The Eagle Claw Kahle hook is equivalent to the Mustad Wide Gap, which is different from the Eagle Claw Wide Gap.

A Bait holder hook is often referred to as a Beak hook, but not all Beak hooks are bait holders. Beak refers mainly to the point of the hook.

There is a Circle hook, an Octopus hook, and an Octopus Circle hook, all of which are different.

With Jig hooks, a flat eye is often referred to as a crossed eye.

The Octopus, Salmon, and Walleye Salmon hooks are very similar and often substituted for each other.
 

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Great post Rick!! Theres a lot of great info in there, a lot fo which I didnt know. :thumbup01: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:
 
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