Bass Fishing Forums - The Bassholes banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,390 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
im having a little trouble trying to flip with my left hand since for the past 24 years i ve been a righty ;D
since my right arm doesnt work very well since i got hurt. took me 2 weeks of practice and a heluva lot of backlashes to cast left handed, so any advice would be great, it seems that i cant get the lure to mak a silent entry i tried applying the basics but it didnt help. thanks for any tips   Dave
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,224 Posts
Maybe you meant to say "pitching"? You can't possibly get a backlash flipping. It's like holding a cane pole with a piece of line tied on the end of it, letting a bait softly touch the water. I flip a lot because of two ruptured rotator cuffs that let my arms wear out pretty fast casting.

Just so we're on the same page, to flip use a long rod. Any real tough reel will do. I used the oldest working Abu Garcia round reels I had because of the heavy line capacity and drag. I use a 7'6" Loomis. I peel out enough line so the lure sits on the water while standing on the boat deck (about 6' from rod tip to water, plus I pull out to the side of the reel another 6' (doubled up), holding that 3' out (arm's length). Then I swing the lure to a spot no more than about 15' away, releasing or letting in the side line. Sometimes I keep holding onto that side line to "hand" the bait, jigging it without having to jig the rod tip. Theoretically that can put a lure 6+6+7' away counting rod length, total 19', but if I put it that far out I lands too hard. I want it to slip into the water with no sound, then let the lure sink. Use the reel to haul in da bass.

Try that. It's easy on the bones. ;D

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,390 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
i worded my post wrong...my bad it is flipping I'm having trouble with cause with the nerve damage in my right arm i cant let the bait go quick enough..got a hook in the hand to prove it!  and the backlash was actually casting not flipping sorry  ;D i guess i need to start proofreading my posts cause it confused me when i just read it!! :withstupid:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,224 Posts
OK, well, when flipping just flip however much line you can dangle, but use the longest rod you have for more reach. You just want the bait to swing out and land softly like a real bug or critter just fluffing the water surface. I flip with both hands, whichever is handier, right hand when on the right (starboard) side of the boat, left hand on the other (port). The reel should be locked down so the spool can't revolve after peeling out as much line as you can handle. I can reach target 12-14' away without holding that spare 6' to my side.

If that nerve damage is long term consider buying one really nice reel with digital backlash control, and practicce using the better hand. They are expensive, but keep you fishing. I had a left-hand retrieve Shimano Calcutta TE DC round baitcast reel last year ($500) that was impossible to backlash. I bought it without my wife knowing. She flipped. She knew I was totally satisfied with my Curado 201's, so why do that? I got it to take the occasional client fishing that has no experience. The next client loved it so bought rod and reel for $75 more than I had in it.

Being more realistic, a closed face spinner reel would be a great change for you. Anyone with one hand can use those. Spinning reels would be easier to use than baitcast, having one tired arm. But a good compromise, if wanting to use baitcasters, is to get and learn to use combined magnetic and centrifugal brakes, available on reels starting around $80. Set the magnetic brake (dial on end of reel) to control end-of-cast problems, and the centrifugal brakes (pins undera removable plate) for close up start-of-cast problems. The idea is to go heavy on both, gradually easing off (push in one pin at a time or dial one lower number at a time) until you find the sweet spot for your line and casting style. That, plus easing off on power of cast, ought to eliminate most backlashes.

The spool tension knob needs to be set once on the first lure selection. Don't move it again until switching to a different weight of lure. When properly set the released spool will let the lure slowly drop about a foot a second. Any looser and you will get extra backlashes. Loosening it for a faster drop allows longer casts, but backlashes are not a good compromise, trading efficiency for distance.

Another tip is to never use a shoulder when casting. From start to end of cast your elbows ought not move out of position while at your sides. Using both hands and wrists, with some forearm assist, snap the bait out. Never reach the rod tip behind you for a cast. Snap the rod tip like cracking a whip. Hold it with tip aimed at the target, snap the rod back like lightning, and just as quick snap it forward, ending the cast with tip aimed at target. The thumb does the rest, feathering the cast to a quiet stop. Your arms will last forever doing that.

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,390 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Jim fortunately the nerve damage gets better everyday I just didn't want to wait a year to fish again! But I appreciate you're advice and hopefully I can apply it. Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
I understand flippin' now. How about some info on pitchin'. I gotta be doing something very wrong because I can't get it down. Help ???
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,224 Posts
In flipping no line peels off the spool when delivering the lure. You only use what you've pulled out and holding and dangling. The spool remain locked, not spinning at all. In pitching the spool does revolve. You begin like flipping, only the amount pulled off the spool is the piece of line from rod tip to your free hand. You hold the lure, load it up with the rod tip, then let it go with whatever more line can be peeled off by the spool, which isn't much. That's all done under-handed, not casting overhead. That increases flipping distances to maybe double to 35'. 35' is a LONG pitch. The only change made in the reel is to make the spool a little more free-spooling, but not so much you get backlashes. Instead of a lure slowly dropping with spool disengaged, the lure should fall quickly, but the spool ought to stop spinning when the lure hits the water. You are then ready to pitch. As you getr more experienced you can go to 100% free-spooling, managing the spool with the thumb. In that case turn off any centrifugal brakes you have (6 pins under a plate pushed all the way in). From there it takes practice instead of watching TV.

Jim
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,987 Posts
For what it's worth, unless you need to get right on top of the heavy cover to drop the lure quietly straight down though a tea cup size hole, you can loop cast with standard tackle. The I fish rarely require flipping or pitching with 8' heavy rods. Pitching is what has become popular and consider "flipping' by the majority of bass fisherman today. The presentation key that is important is keeping the lure close to the water surface to reduce the entry splash and go under over hanging obstickles. I have been using a under hand loop cast long before Hank Parker popularized this cast technique and it is perfect presentation instead of pitching, where the cover allows it. The lure stays low to the water, is very accurate with practice and fast. You are not on top of the bass, maybe 20 to 30 feet away. The key with loop casting is using a 6 1/2 to 7' medium heavy fast action rod that cast well and keeping your boat the same distance form the target as you move along. I use 65 lb Fins superbraid to get the bass out of the cover once it's hooked. Works for the majority if the time.
Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
Thanks Jim and Tom. I've been close to getting it right, just need to practice more. I'll keep pluggin. :D

Gary
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,224 Posts
The only time I flip is when the water is murky enough to allow me to get the boat within 10' or up to about 15'. In fairly clear water pitching allows me to get fairly close, to within 35'. Casting is for very clear water, or I vertically fish deep. Another feature of classic flipping is to be able to place, not plop, a jig in that teacup sized hole and not have to engage the spool at a time I don't want even the click of a reel involved. Sometimes the bite is instant on the surface. There's no time to lock a spool. It's super finesse up-close. Check out some of the BASS Casting Kids videos. There are several categories, lock-spool flippin, free spool pitching, and of course varieties of casting. It's amazing what those kids can do. You can tell they don't own a video game or watch much TV.

Jim
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
100 Posts
imonembad said:
practice practice practice.and then practice some more. it will come to you.
Ever since a was a kid I would get on dads picnic table and cast, flip, and pitch around the yard with an old lure. (Under the house, around & in bushes, in cans, or whatever I could find). I guess I'm just obsessed with my fishing tools, it keeps me "in tune".......... OK I'm not gonna lie, I still do this when I'm bored just not as much!!!
I LOVE THIS GAME!! :boing:
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top