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Discussion Starter #1
I haven't flipped much and was wanting to know how I should adjust my reel for flippin. ie tighten up or loosen the tension and other settings to avoid backlashing and such.

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When I'm using braid, I have very little tension on the spool at all. My lures will freefall when I take my thumb off of the spool. I use my thumb to stop the spool when the bait is landing. However, this technique will produce world-class backlashes on mono. I still leave the internal brakes set very light, but I will adjust the cast control knob so the lure doesn't freefall. I want a slow fall, so the reel will keep enough tension on the line during the cast to prevent the spool from billowing out.
 

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Maybe we need to define flippin. My use of the term is there is no casting whatsoever when flippin. I use an old AbuGarcia 5000 reel from the 1950's for flippin. That is not a long distance casting reel! I like it for its cranking power. I tighten the drag down as hard as it will go using 65# braid on a XHeavy 7'6" "broomstick" rod.

Flippin is supposed to be simply peeling off however much line so when you sling a jig or whatever it only goes about 15 feet from the boat. I peel off about 4' doubled off to the side and leave about 5' dangling off the rod tip. I swing the lure out and contro-release the doubled line at my side. Combined line length is 8' plus the 5' dangling, plus the 7' rod reach. At most the lure will quietly submerge up to 20' from the boat. But if i try for that maximum reach the lure entry noise increases above acceptable. I let the side line out enough to reach no more than 12-15' from the boat to a very specific little target. The whole process is more like using a cane pole only you control how much total line the pole can let out rather than having a fixed amount of line tied to the pole.

Reel cast settings are moot. I set the reel for maximum retrieve power.

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Then what about pitcing, I see people hold the lure in one hand and the rod in the other and sling shot the lure out. This is kinda what i was looking for input on.

Thanks,
Britt
 

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flipping is when you hold the lure or the line at the real and just flip it into cover or close to the bank. Pitching is when you make a under hand cast using the tip of the rod to load and sling the lure out to a tree or the bank or what ever. Pithcing is for a further presentation and flipping is when your pretty much right on the structure your fishing. For instance you would pitch a spinnerbait under a dock and you would flip a jig to the dock pilon. These are general lure applications you can use anylure that you want.
 

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hey britt,I cannot say there is a blueprint on how you should set up your reel,Now that I have got used to my baitcaster I turn the brake system off and just use my thumb.So just keep at it start with the brake high and keep lowering it
 

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I keep it loose when im pitching and use my thumb. ( I pitch more then anything )

Last year in a tourney I was pitching a senko type lure and a guy on his dock asked me how much weight I was useing and I told him 1/16th oz. He said he couldnt pitch that far with an ounce weight lol.
 

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Flippin came along to replace outlawed Doodling. A very effective bassing rig was a 10' long cane pole with a short piece of string tied to the pole tip, then down the length of the pole in case the pole broke. BASS began restricting rod lengths to less than 8' until it was impractical to "doodle". The work-around was "flippin".

A big difference between flippin and pitchin is when flippin the reel spool remains still, no line playing off it. Line is taken off beforehand, however much you can handle off the rod tip and extra held to your side. When pitchin the reel spool is best set for a super free spool to allow effortless playout of line. If you tried to cast with the reel set that way it would be a guaranteed incredible birdsnest. Good pitchin requires a good reel (talking baitcaster today) that has a very free spool. When looking for a good pitchin reel I choose one that when empty of line and set free-spool, a flick of the spool gets it spinning for at least a minute. A Pflueger President can do that. An Ambassador 5000 can't.

When pitchin the lure is held in free hand and sort of sling-shot usiong both tension in bent rod and a slight swinging motion, of which there are many styles. In all styles thumb control is VITAL. When flippin in general the lure is just held as low to the water as possible, spool locked and ready for reeling, then gently swinging the lure to target while letting out any extra line your free hand is pinching (peeled off the reel). When pitchin the lure shuld keep a low trajectory, 2-3 feet above water, and make a quiet entry. When flippin the lure is kept inches above water and makes a totally silent entry with practically no surface disturbance. Effective flippin to 15', 30' for pitchin. Beyond that you are casting for a much noisier lure entry.

When flippin I prefer the extra pinched line, total about 5-6', held between reel and first rod guide, to add control to the lure placement, and to feel instant light bites so common when flipping close cover. A lure sort of climbs into the water like a bug sneaking in, and if seen by a bass, it's nailed on that first fall. But if it's inhaled and the bass sits there, I need that line in my fingers to feel that. When I'm ready to set the hook, I turn loose of that free line, letting the lure get swallowed easier, then snap the rod tip, which straightens the loose line I just dropped, and all in the same motion hoping to boat the fish right then, no fight, all in one motion if possible. It's a cross his eyes thing for me using 65# braid and a XHeavy rod with XFast action. Compare that to maybe a MHeavy power M action pitchin rod. Big difference. The heavy rod won't load up enough energy to propel the lure when pitchin. It's more like a long broomstick.

Some folks just let the lure dangle to the water, then backswing it, then reaching it as far out as the long rod and that rod tip to lure line length will allow. If bass will bite that close in then great. If the water is dirty enough, that'll work. I just like having the option of that extra 6' available in case I see a better target a little farther out, as so often happens. By that I mean seeing a really fishy little spot about 6" square, then about 3 feet farther out there's a big swirl around a stob. In that instant I would want to adjust in that instant to let a little more line out as I swing for that better target. But if all I have is 5' off the rod tip and rod 7' long, I can only reach the first intended target 12' away without moving the boat. So having that extra pinched line totalling 5' I can possibly go ahead and reach that surprise target up to 5' farther out.

In summary what are some options for that pinched line held out to my side, line between reel and first rod guide? I can hang onto it at all times in lure placement to attain a stealth landing with no noise. I can hang onto it all the way through flippin to retain maximum feeling contact with the lure. I can let the line down toward the rod as I lay the lure out, feeling the lure into a soft landing, supplying exactly the length of line needed to get on target. I can snap the line to the rod the instant the line from rod tip to lure is straightened and lure is a max height falling to the water, the snapping line giving the lure an erratic landing. I can flip from under a tree limb that only allows say 3' of line from rod tip to lure. Distance to target is had according to how much side line I hold out. I'd have to do more actual flipping of the rod tip to get the lure moving, then release the side line.

Jim
 

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Maybe this will help with understanding how to get more distance flippin.


Add up the lengths available. 6 ft from rod tip to lure dangling almost to the water surface, about 7 ft of rod reach, and another spare 3 ft plus 3 ft held out to the side. That allows up to 20 ft of targeting.

Swing the lure gently towards the target, releasing the side line as needed. If you don't hold extra line to your side your maximum reach is rod length plus the lead line below the rod tip. If the water is dirty enough you can usually get close enough to bass to get by with 14 feet of reach.

Rod is a Heavy or X Heavy "broomstick" flippin rod that flexes only when you have a big bass or a load of slop. There is no need of tip action for loading up as in pitching or casting. Reel spool is locked when flippin. Don't let the spool rotate! The reel is for letting the line out before flippin, then reeling a lure in. If no fish is on it just pull the side line out again and drag the lure back to you for another flip. Position the lure slightly above the water and swing it out again. The reel should have a lot of cranking power, either 3:1 or up to 5:1 with a stout drag. Line for me is 65# Power Pro braid. You would probably take a dip in the lake if it broke while leaning back on it. Use a "braid knot" to tie the lure on. The line is doubled through the line eye or ring, so the line won't be sliding over a ring wire end and getting cut like a single line sometimes does. I fish the same braid knot all day without retying. It has to be sawed apart to remove the lure.

Jim
 

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Ouachita said:
Flippin came along to replace outlawed Doodling. A very effective bassing rig was a 10' long cane pole with a short piece of string tied to the pole tip, then down the length of the pole in case the pole broke. BASS began restricting rod lengths to less than 8' until it was impractical to "doodle".
Jim
I remember doodling back in the early '60's on the Great Pee Dee River in South Carolina. We would use the same set up you described with a red or white pork strip as bait. Worked great for bass in the reeds.
 

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Sirius Rich said:
I remember doodling back in the early '60's on the Great Pee Dee River in South Carolina.
Thats very cool Rich! I live not 10 miles from the Pee Dee. :thumbup01:
 

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Excellent post and diagram Jim!! :clap:
 

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The reel I use now for flipping/pitching is a Citica 100DSV. I have the tension knob turned way down, so that the spool is loose, and I have an proportionate amount of brakes set/not set........that being 3 set and 3 not set. I offset them.

I use that setup for flipping and pitching jigs and soft plastics, and I am able to get my lures up under docks without backlashing the spool. You just have to get used to having it set so loose and adjust accordingly. ;)
 

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LakeCityYankee said:
Thats very cool Rich! I live not 10 miles from the Pee Dee. :thumbup01:
Those were the days!! My father was stationed at MB AFB and he took me fishing a lot on the Pee Dee. When he didn't, I would fish the State Park pier or just surf fish. I think I fished 300 days a year for three years before we moved to Abilene, Texas. Fishing was hard to do there, lol.

But back to the topic, I will add that I will grab the line between the first and second eye when flipping deep grass. 15' or deeper.
 

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I prefer to pitch most of the time..However i learned to flip first. taught me lure placement. great tips here. Anyone else flippin these days??
 

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i pitch more than anything, but every once and awhile when neccesary i'll flip. Jim and Tom explained the differences between flipping and pitching a looooooooong time ago on the BM site. I too had it bassackwards!! Dave
 

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Someone should make a video. Then I would totally have it.
 

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Im the same way, I pitch 90% of the time, and flip the remaining 10%. I have always done this, mostly because my wife fishes with me, and she doesnt flip or pitch, so its easier for me to stay far enough away to pitch, and she can cast. Actually it has made me a much more accurate pitcher. ;)
 
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Ouachita said:
Maybe we need to define flippin. My use of the term is there is no casting whatsoever when flippin. I use an old AbuGarcia 5000 reel from the 1950's for flippin. That is not a long distance casting reel! I like it for its cranking power. I tighten the drag down as hard as it will go using 65# braid on a XHeavy 7'6" "broomstick" rod.

Flippin is supposed to be simply peeling off however much line so when you sling a jig or whatever it only goes about 15 feet from the boat. I peel off about 4' doubled off to the side and leave about 5' dangling off the rod tip. I swing the lure out and contro-release the doubled line at my side. Combined line length is 8' plus the 5' dangling, plus the 7' rod reach. At most the lure will quietly submerge up to 20' from the boat. But if i try for that maximum reach the lure entry noise increases above acceptable. I let the side line out enough to reach no more than 12-15' from the boat to a very specific little target. The whole process is more like using a cane pole only you control how much total line the pole can let out rather than having a fixed amount of line tied to the pole.

Reel cast settings are moot. I set the reel for maximum retrieve power.

Jim
Yep
 

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TxMrbass said:
Ouachita said:
Maybe we need to define flippin. My use of the term is there is no casting whatsoever when flippin. I use an old AbuGarcia 5000 reel from the 1950's for flippin. That is not a long distance casting reel! I like it for its cranking power. I tighten the drag down as hard as it will go using 65# braid on a XHeavy 7'6" "broomstick" rod.

Flippin is supposed to be simply peeling off however much line so when you sling a jig or whatever it only goes about 15 feet from the boat. I peel off about 4' doubled off to the side and leave about 5' dangling off the rod tip. I swing the lure out and contro-release the doubled line at my side. Combined line length is 8' plus the 5' dangling, plus the 7' rod reach. At most the lure will quietly submerge up to 20' from the boat. But if i try for that maximum reach the lure entry noise increases above acceptable. I let the side line out enough to reach no more than 12-15' from the boat to a very specific little target. The whole process is more like using a cane pole only you control how much total line the pole can let out rather than having a fixed amount of line tied to the pole.

Reel cast settings are moot. I set the reel for maximum retrieve power.

Jim
Yep
I agree also, stealth is the way to go flipping, quiet entry is important, and you can actually flip effectivly quite a distance from the boat with practice. I have learned to pitch with a very quiet entry also, it takes practice but can be done.
 
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