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My fishing partner for nearly 40 years loves to back seat. Ron owns his own boat and is a very good bass fisherman, however he prefers to fish in the back seat of my boat whenever the opportunity allows. Ron is a very good jig and plastic worm fisherman and has wacky wormed since I can remember. Wacky style of hooking the worm with an exposed hook through the middle of the worm and dragging it along like a propeller along the bottom doesn't appeal to me, however it does appeal to bass as Ron has proved time and time again.
The last trip we made Ron rigged up a wacky jig worm combination that just about made me think he had finally lost it. He was using Jackall Wacky-Jig head and Flick Shake worms, although Senkos work well also. The jig head is a peahead without the skirt collar and has a shorter hook. This dam thing really works great and for all you wacky riggers, this is a hot set up.
Tom
 

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a wacky worm on a jig head sounds pretty interesting.

I tried to find the Jackall jig head but had no luck. http://www.jackall-lures.com/

I have found some info on the Flick Shake and they sound cool. I wrote Jackall asking for more info on their line of soft plastics. Will let yall know what I find out. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #3
LakeCityYankee said:
a wacky worm on a jig head sounds pretty interesting.

I tried to find the Jackall jig head but had no luck. http://www.jackall-lures.com/

I have found some info on the Flick Shake and they sound cool. I wrote Jackall asking for more info on their line of soft plastics. Will let yall know what I find out. :D
The Jacky Jigs are Owner/Cultiva product and the web site has mention of them, couldn't find a product order number for the pea or round head jig. I will talk to Ron today and find out more info.
Tom
 

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Before plastic creatures came out I made my own very simple creature fished whacky style on a jig. I don't bother with it anymore since I have pounds of creatures to use up, but someone might like trying it. Take a stick worm, dip an end in boiling water about 20 seconds to soften, time varies by make. Flatten the end to make a paddle. Repeat on the other end. I slipped a split ring over the egg sack (middle) then pushed hook through the ring. When retrieved, falling or trolled the ends flap wildly. It's just something your bass probably haven't seen yet.

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Spoke to Dennis Yamamoto of Owner Hooks and Owner of Japan supplies the Jacky jig head to Jackall direct. Owner does have a Finesse head jig, very similar # 5149 that comes in 1/32 to 1/8 ounce in 1/32 increments. The most popular is the 1/16 with #1 hook. The jigs come with size #4 or #1 Owner hooks.
Ron was using the 1/8 w/#1 hook.
Owner's phone # 1.714/668.9011
The Wacky jig has been under the radar and kept quite by the tournament pros for about 3 years.
 

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Would you mind taking a picture of it? I'm having trouble visualizing it. You can email a photo to me and I'll post it if that's OK. The jig or a similar one with the worm arrangement is what I'd like to see.

Jim
 

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If you took that jig and speared the worm in the middle (half way to the tail) so that when holding it by the line it dangles doubled over, that's what I'm used to calling a whacky worm. Before someone called it "whacky" we just called it a "jigger worm" when using a 3/8-1/2 oz buck hair jig instead of a thin hook. It just never occurred to anyone here to rig it for a slow fall. There really wasn't a thick wired long shanked bass hook anyone could trust. Most would spread or straighten on a big fish. We wanted it to fall and flutter around. We'd jerk it back up in zig zags then let it fall again. The hook on our custom jigs was large enough to also pin another worm by the nose, the tail reaching well past the doubled ends of the whacky worm part. The rig looked like a "stick man" with his arms down to his side.

I'll make one tomorrow and post it. Never once did anyone that I knew of use a long hook the way worms are T-rigged today. We all had plenty of jigs. Another way we fished Creme worms was to thread mono through the middle of a worm from head down almost to the tail. Two to three crappie hooks were embedded and tied to that backbone line so only the hook bends showed. We slaughtered bass on that, many times catching 50 or more nice bass a day per person without even thinking about looking for bass or finding a pattern. Very often we could tie the boat to one tree and catch bass and crappie there all day or all night using one of those worm rigs. In those days there was no submerged vegetation at all. Everything green in the valley died after flooding it, and it was 15 years before anyone saw submergent plants. Laydowns, standing timber and brush piles was our cover, so we could fish that rig without constantly snagging something.

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I found an article in WON Bass and will copy it and send it. The jig head is a round or pea head, no lead collar that extends down the hook and a straight short shank hook, no bends. The worm is wacky rigged, simply hooked in the middle with the ends sticking straight out both sides. The worm keeps the jig hook from rolling over and laying flat on the bottom. Very simple, just like a wacky style worm with the hook in the middle, nothing fancy or special.
Tom
 
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Seemed pretty basic to me. Although around laydowns this would get hung allot. A jig head with a brush guard would be good for grassy or timber laden areas.
 

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I contacted Jackyl about the Flick Worms and was put in touch with a guy named Curt. I asked him about the Flick worms and this is what he wrote me:
Hey Jared,

The only stores that are carrying the Flick Shake Worms and wacky Jig Head currently are Performance Tackle 714-826-1400 and Anglers Marine 714-666-2628. I understand that they will take phone orders and ship out. It started out as a test and I sent many samples out to our pro staff and pros to test and stores. But quickly grew into a huge demand and reorders from pros and stores. I placed a big order and should receieve soon and will have other stores and internet site to direct you to. If they can not help you check back with me in about two weeks. Thanks for your intrest, you won't be disapointed.

Jackall
Curt
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Jared,
I started this thread under Tips & Tactics, Wacky Jigs. Dennis Yamamoto of Owner Hooks had given me their jig #5144 and George Kramer who wrote the article I sent confirmed the information you posted and I forwarded you his email. I don't think the worms are that essential, however the Flick Shake worms has the egg sack in the middle of the worm and the worm is a saltwater plastisol formula that is heavy salt to make it sink and be a little more durable.
Tom
 

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I know Tom :) I just thought itd be good to have the distributor of Flick Worms in this thread under the board Lure Talk for easy referrence. :thumbup01:

I must have missed your email... Im good at missing emails sometimes hehe. I will go double check.
 

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Oh yeah I see it now woops LOL Thank you Tom :D
 

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I merged the threads for less confusion :D
 

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Flick Shakin'

http://www.bassfan.com/tips_article.asp?ID=233

Kotaro Kiriyama
Makin' Bacon With Flick Shakin'

Thursday, September 20, 2007

Fishing pressure. Those two words are enough to scare any BassFan. And with so much pressure on many of the most traveled tournament venues, catching a limit today seems more difficult that ever.

The dropshot method – developed in Japan where intense fishing pressure is legendary – helped us for a while, and then the shaky-head worm moved in. Some pros are even going back to their roots and digging out pre-rigged multi-hook worms, looking for a new edge.

But Japanese pro Kota Kiriyama traveled all the way back to his roots in Japan, and helped export another Japanese technique to bring help home the bacon. It's called flick-shaking, and it's reportedly now more popular than the dropshot in the Land of the Rising Sun.

Flick-shaking has led Kiriyama to some strong finishes. And lest we forget, famed lure designer Seiji Kato, now of Jackall, used it to win the co-angler division at the Amistad Bassmaster Elite Series this year.

What's Shakin'?

Jackall Lures introduced a specific worm and jighead for the Flick-Shake technique. In essence, the rig's a finesse worm that's wacky-rigged on a jighead. But the jighead is critical, and Jackall's Wacky jighead features a short-shank hook and no weedguard. The Jackall website describes it this way:

"The Wacky jighead technique which Jackall calls "Flick Shakin'" will be the next finesse technique in the United States. The Flick Shake worm has a built-in curved design, which creates a squirming action that the fish cannot resist. The jighead eye is designed at a 90-degree angle for better hooksetting and less snags. The hook has a short shank to allow the worm more action."

Okay, there's the product promo/info, now how do you fish the thing?

"The worm I use is called the Flick Shake, and so we call the technique flick-shaking," Kiriyama said. "It's a finesse version of Senko fishing. I use 6- to 8-pound line on a spinning rod with this tiny 4.8-inch worm. It dances in the water as it falls, and has an erratic action.

"You could use any thin, small worm for this technique, but to maximize the potential, I use the Flick Shake worm. It's made with a pre-bent shape that creates a different wobble."


A key to the technique, Kiriyama says, is the small, properly constructed finesse Jackall Wacky jighead.


The big key to flick-shaking is more in the fall than in working the lure. And the fall can last a long time with a jighead weight of only 1/16- or 3/32-ounce.

"Whereas a dropshot is more of a vertical technique – and you can use the Flick Shake worm for that, by the way – the flick-shake technique is more a casting fall-bait (approach)," Kiriyama noted. "You use it when you might use a Senko, but where fish are tired of looking at those. It's a more advanced version.

"The basic fall-bait technique is you just throw it out and let it fall to the bottom," he added. "I catch a lot of fish as it's falling. If it gets to the bottom, then you just slowly drag it back. Maybe you shake it just a little bit or just pull a little bit. You catch more fish by doing nothing."

He also said that with an open hook, the fish often hook themselves, so it's "much easier" to hook a fish "than with a Texas-rigged Senko or something where you have to set the hook."

Two other key tips from Kiriyama:


"I fish it from a foot to 10 feet deep. You can use it in 20 feet too if you have patience. It's great on suspended fish, and on smallmouths. And it's very good on schooling fish. It's been one of my secret techniques for 3 years now."


"The only problem I've found with it is you can't pick the size (of fish you'll catch). They all bite it. The biggest one I've caught is a 9-pounder in practice at Clear Lake this year."

Notable

> Kiryama's favorite Flick Shake worm colors are green-pumpkin, watermelon, and sunburn-melon.

> BassFanArmy.com ran a Dock Talk piece on Seiji Kato's Amistad win, dateline March 16, 2007. To read it, click here.

> When asked if any other pros are using the flick-shake technique, Kiriyama said Grant Goldbeck is. "Seiji kicked his butt at Amistad with it," Kiriyama said chuckling. "Seiji had like 19 pounds in the back of the boat when Goldbeck had maybe 3. We support Grant now with baits."
 
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