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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I read the bass newsgroup on a fairly regular basis, and one of the posters I highly respect wrote an article in which he strongly recommends AGAINST trimming weedguards. Rich Zaleski, aka RichZ can be found at www.RichZ.com. He argues that the shorter weedguard acts as an impediment to hookup since it is more difficult for the fish to compress when it strikes and actually serves to decrease the hook gap.

Many of my bassin' buddies routinely trim their weedguards and have urged me to do the same. Before I start cutting up perfectly good jigs, I would like to hear from any of you who have strong feelings on this matter.
 

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That is part of my standard tune up on my jigs. I'm not complaining about lost jig fish because it rarely happens to me. We have discussed in length on a thread here, about the way you set the hook while jig fishing. Perhaps that is the real issue. I have always trimmed my weed guards to facilitate a smoother hook up.
 
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For me it all depends on what the weedguard looks like. If I feel it is too stiff, bulky, or extends to far past the hook then I will trim some away.
 

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If you are talking about a standard fiber bunch type of weed guard, you should always trim it into a V shape. First separate the fiber bunch into two branches forming the V on both sides of the hook point. Then take a sharp scissors and cut the fibers that extend more than 1/4 inch above the hook point, parallel to the hook shank. Or use jigs with a Y weed guard. I do not use weed guards unless absolutely necessary. Instead use a plastic worm section fastened to a Hitch Hiker spring attached to the jigs hook eye and Texas expose the hook point, then pinch the plastic to skin cover the point. Flipping and pitching jigs, like the Arkie jig head design works OK with fiber or Y weed guards, if the hook design allows enough space for the hook point to penetrate the inside the basses mouth behind the tough cartilage lips and allow the jig head to be outside of the mouth. The problem is the bass strikes a jig like it eats a crawdad, not with it's lips but the back of the roof of it's mouth to crunch and kill the prey. You feel the tick as the jig hits the back of the basses mouth, then jerk the jig out while the bass has it's mouth open helping to eject it. The chances of hooking the bass is very low percentage, unless the bass is directly below the rod tip or has turned with the jig, using weed guards or short shank wide gap hooks.
Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the info guys. Tom, you remain a fountain of information and experience.
 

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I always spread and trim my weed guards, as well as trim my skirts even before I get them wet. I have been doing so forever. I have yet to use a jig that has a weed guard so stiff that a bass cant compress it and get the hook. If I did, I would surely steer clear of that brand.
 

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LakeCityYankee said:
I always spread and trim my weed guards, as well as trim my skirts even before I get them wet. I have been doing so forever. I have yet to use a jig that has a weed guard so stiff that a bass cant compress it and get the hook. If I did, I would surely steer clear of that brand.
You would be shocked to know how many big bass bite a jig with a weed guard and spit it out before you even feel anything. Just watch a bed bass hit a jig, that bass is pissed off just trying to remove it, not eat it. With any design weed guard you will miss strikes, I know I do.
Tom
 
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Interesting topic. I am not a jig efficinado (sp?) but caught several Sunday flipping into reeds using a 1/2 ounce jig with a weed guard cut too short in my opinion (My friends). I was snagging the reeds way to much. I caught 3 nice bass on this setup though. The bite was ever so faint. Just almost had to set the hook on anything you felt.

I was wondering if they have any jigs with skirts that look like the stand up jig heads or shakey heads that allow for a texas rigging of the trailer? You know the ones with a spring so the hook is below the trailer not running through the trailer. Similar to what Tom said but different. I want it to have the silicone skirting material like normal jigs but with the spring so the craw or whatever we use for the trailer can hook onto that spring and then the hook texposed into the trailer making it more weedless. I would like to get rid of the plastic hook guards also.
 

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KeithsCatch said:
Interesting topic. I am not a jig efficinado (sp?) but caught several Sunday flipping into reeds using a 1/2 ounce jig with a weed guard cut too short in my opinion (My friends). I was snagging the reeds way to much. I caught 3 nice bass on this setup though. The bite was ever so faint. Just almost had to set the hook on anything you felt.

I was wondering if they have any jigs with skirts that look like the stand up jig heads or shakey heads that allow for a texas rigging of the trailer? You know the ones with a spring so the hook is below the trailer not running through the trailer. Similar to what Tom said but different. I want it to have the silicone skirting material like normal jigs but with the spring so the craw or whatever we use for the trailer can hook onto that spring and then the hook texposed into the trailer making it more weedless. I would like to get rid of the plastic hook guards also.
Owner "Ultra Sled Head" BPS carries them.
Tom
 

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I always trim my weed guards. For me most jigs are made with too many fibers, but I figure they'd rather over-do it than fall too short. I trim the ends to barely cover the hook point. I then drag the jig over my hand to test springiness. I take a fingernail clipper and begin clipping them one at a time at the base next to the leadhead, testing again until it looks like one more cut strand would let the hook snag me. So I both trim and thin them. If I over-thin I remove it all and use that jig guardless, which is actually much better if not dragged through heavy cover.

To keep a bite longer I prefer overly thick very soft plastic or pork trailers, whatever feels like real food in my hand. Guard or not, in my experience bass tend to hold on the more trailer there is, as much as the jig can carry and leave some hook gap. I save torn GULP worms to cap a jig hook point with a 1/4" piece.

Jim
 

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Ouachita said:
I save torn GULP worms to cap a jig hook point with a 1/4" piece.
excellent idea Jim! Thank you for sharing! :D
 

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I trim the weed guard so it stays level with the hook. that way it is not bunched up at the tip and it tapers more. It still serves the same purpose, but is considerably less bulky.
 

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One reason that fiber weed guards are made with more and longer fibers than needed is to accommodate what is available from suppliers. Example is Barlow's Tackle. Fiber weed guards;
http;//www.barlowstackle.com/acb/showprod.cfm?&DID=6&Product_ID=2112&CATID=59
Shown on that page is fiber weed guards and Y weed guards. Both style have the same basic diameter so the molds to accommodate the different styles.
The Y or V style weed guards work well for most applications without any modification. Some fisherman will put a curl into the Y or V style with a knife edge drawn against it so the guard collapses easier. I don't use a weed guard and just add a worm section using the Hitch Hiker if needed.
Tom
Ps; never trim a hair jig's hair length as that will drastically change how the hair moves in the water. The natural hair is tapered and softer near the end, allowing the hair to ungulate as the jig moves through the water column and flares out when the jig stops. Trimming rubber or silicone skirts is OK and the strands shouldn't extend more than a 1/2" beyond the hook bend.
 
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