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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have this question posted in many forums so why not another one ....

Im a Complete Novice when it comes to a Baitcaster .... I want to learn thou ...
So what are some of your Pros for ? and Cons against ? Baitcasters ....

What should I be looking for and what should I stay away from ???

Any tips will be appreciated .....

I am gonna get one soon (in about a month for my Birthday) ......
I will get it at Gander Mountain thou I havent decided on which yet ....

It will depend on which is in stock , and what feels right ....

I have looked over several models and the 3 or 4 im really impressed with are

Team Diawa Super Advantage model (i think thats the name of it)
Abu Garcia Revo's
Quantum
and the Shimanos'

again any input will be helpful , thanks in advance
 

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I have several Abu Revo STX reels. All cast like a dream and if you can swing it I would recommend the STX models over the less expensive Revo as it has features that will take some of the angst out of learning.

The most important rule in using a baitcaster is practice, don't try and overpower the cast, just let it happen, and don't buy expensive line until ya get use to the feel of the brake while enhancing your ability to thumb the spool. As you get more proficient it will be less brake and more thumb. Good luck and have fun.

I copied the below off of Abu's site:

Abu Garcia® is starting a revolution with the new REVO™ series of low-profile baitcast reels, the fastest low-profile reel Abu Garcia has ever designed.

The tough REVO is packed with innovative features, including a Duragear™ oversized brass main gear for maximum cranking power and the innovative Carbon Matrix™ Drag System for incredible smoothness across all drag settings. The reel also is designed with aluminum components for light-weight performance and lasting durability.

The Linear Magnetic Brake™ system found on the SX and STX models allow anglers a wide range of adjustments to fine tune the reel for any application. In addition, the STX model features an Everslik™ coated pinion shaft and pawl, which dramatically reduces friction for enhanced casting while improving the durability of these components.

The STX also features the innovative Infini Spool II™ system, which is separated from the drive train, minimizes friction for optimal performance – even with the lightest tackle. Built tough with Abu Garcia’s traditional Swedish engineering, the REVO is ideal for nearly all freshwater applications, from casting crankbaits or spinnerbaits to pitching and flipping softbaits.
 

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This is a good topic that will help many today and in the future. You'll get a lot of opinions and experiences on all of your points. Why get a baitcaster? There are several reasons why they should be carried along with a spinning rig. While a spinner is really necessary for fishing very light baits 1/4 oz and lighter at respectable casting distances, a good baitcaster is excellent for casting, pitching or flipping heavy baits. The design of a baitcasting rod allows better control of heavy fish, the guides on top of the rod allowing line to press toward the rod, while line on a spinner pulls against the guides. I've broken spinning rods and guides 10-1 over the last 35 years since getting my first. As for me I have to select a heavier spinning rod than I would a baitcaster given one line test. For instance using a 15# line will call for a beefy medium heavy spinning rod (8-20# line range), or a medium power baitcasting rod (10-20# line range), to cut down on rod fatigue. Some will argue that point. It's just a personal observation.

Thanks for starting the topic. We need more topic starters like you.

Jim
 

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Id answer but I am a bad person to do so. Every baitcasting reel I own is falling apart and a worthless hunk of junk LOL! Sad but true. Im a spin tackle junkie but I do use baitcasting for A LOT of stuff. I need to update one of these days.
 

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If you look down the page on this forum read "Learning to cast and spool line". I tried to cover the basic for bait cast and spinning reels by posting that topic.
Tom
Note; The Daiwa Advantage "Super Tuned" is a great reel for the $139 price and I beleive it to be the best buy available today.
 

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I am not sure if you are a big or small person but I am a very short man and have small hands. I go after a low profile bait caster bucause it is comfortable in my hand and I can cast it all day without getting tired.
 

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We'll need to merge this thread with Tom's previous thread. What he posted fits perfectly with this topic. Good advice on how to use a baitcaster is there, and why use one (and what kind is good to begin with) here. We've come full circle on the basics, got a few loose ends left to cover, and will get into some advanced stuff later. Glad to see folks joining in on this.

Jim
 

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:thumbup01: Yep, and we surely have more input that can come from members not already commenting on that at http://thebassholes.com/bassin-forums/index.php?topic=1475.0 Since February I figure those who did contribute have something new to add, too. Everyone of us has a reel we really like so far and feel the price was right, so lets hear it. :idea:

Jim
 
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Recently I purchased a BPS Pro Qualifier reel and I have to say that I am very impressed with it. When I bought it BPS had it on sale for $79. At that price I am hard pressed to find a better reel. It casts very smoothly and the drag so far has performed great.

I received advise from a guide a while agao that I believe to be great advise so I will share it here. I asked him what was more important a great reel or a great rod. (If you have lots of money then this tip is meaningless for you. For those of us who have a smaller budget this is a good thing to remember) His response was the rod. He said the rod is your link to the fish and the better the rod the more sensitive it is and thus easier for you to detect a strike.

So I would rather buy a lessor reel something in the $80-$120 range and buy a top notch rod then to buy a top notch reel with a lower end rod.
 

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Keith,This is not met a an anal comment, but the line is the link between you and the fish. You can cast line wrapped around a beer can and catch bass.
Todays rods are light weight and very sensitive and several good choices under $150 are readlily available, as are reels. Not a lot goes wrong with a good quality reel that can't be repaired by a good technition. However if the reel is made from poor quality materials in the gears and bearings, nothing can be done to correct that problem. Good after market drags are available to convert any reel to have a smooth operating drag.
In my opinion it is better to have your out dated high quality reel serviced professionally than to buy a lower price reel with poor components.
There is not much you can with rods, they are what they are, so buy a good quality rod that you like the feel and balance of. How much money you spend on a rod is dependant on your ego and like reels there are several good rods available around $150 or less. Rods are another topic and we have that started and should revisit them.
Tom
 
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I know line is the link between the fish and us but considering either a reel or a rod I would opt for a better quality rod. Reels today in the $100 range or so are not inferior reels of yesteryear. They work quit nicely and cast well and will last a long time. However cheap rods are not near as sensitive as better quality rods and are heavier and more fatiguing then better quality rods.

I still stand by my assessment Tom.
 

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I would say that the majority of rods and reels in the $100 range are decent quality. Several of my combos are around the $200 mark, and they are close enough to the best stuff I own, that I don't mind fishing with them at all. But the fact remains, you get what you pay for, and the more you spend on one combo, the more you will want to spend on the next. If you dont want 500 dollar combos for everything, don't buy any at all. Once you fish one, you will want another.
 

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I won a Kistler rod years ago and got hooked on quality from that. I'd fished with a partner's quality rods, but was too uneasy about that to appreciate the quality. I knew his were superior, but didn't study it out to know what was improved. As for me I can't go back to cheaper rod or reel. I just can't hardly catch fish on subtle bites with a modestly priced OK rod now. I use sensitive line, not the most expensive. My go to is Yo-Zuri Hybrid and braid nowadays. Feeling the line plus a hand in contact with the blank lets me know what's happening. Long, very light, strong rods are a must to put many hours in fishing. You would find some rods cheaper than $250 in my boat, but those are mostly for guests not wanting to use the high dollar rods. I do have some medium priced rods from $120-$175 and they are good rods. I simply have better and will fish those first. I detect many more bites.

As far as reels go I have a wide assortment from a $75 BPS model to some costing $300 (pitching reel). I won't use a pricey reel for stripers or catfish. I save the better for long trouble free casts, heavier drags for heavy braid, and long term quality performance. It's true those hold up longer, are easy to get rebuilt many times, while cheaper reels just don't retain the quality as well when rebuilt. Whatever they use in the original reel sure seems to me better than replacement parts which seem to wear out faster than the original, except in high quality reels. I think the better reels are simply a better investment if nothing else better.

I doubt expensive isn't always highest quality. Shimano hasn't let me down yet, so their expensive line is something I trust. There's no reason to switch brands yet. Even though there are better reels on board my day to day favorites are still several lefty Shimano CU-201B Curado Bantams up to 14# test line. It's a familiarity thing. They are discontinued, but rebuild like new, so they will outlast me. They were originally $120 reels, the best all around reel ever made IMHO.

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
update :

k guys since my intro to Baitcasters wasnt exactly pleasant ....

The more I found out about them .... the more it seemed like I would have to increase all around the gear that I would have to bring in with me to fish .... well I for one am up for a good haul sometimes .... but who wants to make on the average 3 trips to pick up gear at the pond and haul it back to the vehicle when your done ....

Not me .... 2 trips k .... but 3 ....

so I have decided to play around with a cheaper Baitcaster to learn the ropes .... until if and when I feel good enough to take this out on the water .....

I appreciate all the respones I got .... and i thank you ....

there now that has been covered .... look for my new post about spinning reels soon ..... thanks alot guys
 

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I posted "learning to cast and spool line" on this forum, start by reading that.
A little history with bait casting reels, they were the first type of reel that used gears to multiply the ratio of cranking turns to spool revolutions. The modern era starting around WWII introduced reels that disengaged the reel crank from the spool to allow the spool to spin more freely and the level wind disengagement followed. All bait casting reels were basically round shaped until Plueger Supreme came out with a tear drop shape that extended the level wind further away from the spool to reduce drag on the line coming off the revolving spool. The next big change was the Lew's BB1 that patented the low profile palm shaped reels of today. The original "round reels" are stronger than the low profile reels and you still have a choice of shapes.
Most experienced bass fisherman prefer the round reels for heavier lures like swimbaits or musky baits. Daiwa Millionaire-S and Shimano Calcutta are the top choices. The reason is strength and line retrieve in inches per crank revolution, which is the value of importance to bass fisherman, not gear ratios. The reel size and weight becomes important and todays light weight reels tend to have small diameter narrow spools and the smaller the spool diameter and narrower, the less line capacity it has and the more revolutions required to take up line in inches at the end of the cast. The round reels tend to have faster level wind worm gear ratios that criss cross the line faster preventing line digging into loose line underneath, however do not cast as freely as the low profile reels.
My suggestion is use the lighter weight low profile reels where line size is under 20 lb test mono/fluoro and round reels where line size exceeds 20 lb or faster recovery of line is needed like crank baits. Going to a 7 to 1 ratio low profile reel is not your best choice, a larger round reel with 5+ to 1 is better in my opinion.
What makes one reel better than another?, quality of materials and workmanship. How much you can afford is dependant on each person. You can buy good quality bass new reels around $100 or spend over $400.
Tom
 
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