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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anybody have tips and recommendations on a baitcaster setup. I've used spinning gear for for about 35 years. I've purchased a baitcaster twice couldn't get the hang of it, and promptly gave up and went back to my Mitchell spinning gear. If I remember I spent more time clearing line tangles than fishin.

I'm determined to try again this summer.

Are there clear advantages to using a baitcaster for Bass and Crappie, and what would be a good reel to learn with? Any advice to smooth the transition would be great.

Thanks,
Doyle
 

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You can cheap out on spinning reel and still catch fish. You have to spend a little more on a caster.

This is a good for selection.
http://www.thebassholes.com/bassin-forums/index.php?topic=35133.0

The bass pro Pro Qualifer has 2 break systems and easy to learn on.

Bait casters handle larger baits better. If you tossing little grubs and jigs stick to slabs, stay with spinning. Pay attention to the recommended lure weight range of your rod. Match your lure to the rod. Bait casting for for the heavier bass fishing tactics.

Some where there is topic on setting up and casting a bait caster, but I cant find it.
 

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This will help on the backlashes :
Once you have your line on the reel, walk off the amount you figure you can cast + some extra yards ( I normaly tie it to our fence or stop sign then walk it off ) Once your where you need to be use some electric tape and go over your spool. That way when you get a backlash it wont be so deep and easier to get out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the tips!

I was looking at the Abu Revo sx, I'll have to check out the Orra. Probably order one of those two rather than run out and buy one and have it ruin my opening weekend.

Fish4FunInFl said:
This will help on the backlashes :
Once you have your line on the reel, walk off the amount you figure you can cast + some extra yards ( I normally tie it to our fence or stop sign then walk it off ) Once your where you need to be use some electric tape and go over your spool. That way when you get a backlash it wont be so deep and easier to get out.
This sounds like a great tip to me. Simple and effective. I'll definitely be using this, Thanks!
 

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If you are right handed keep the reel handles pointing at the sky when you cast. Put your thumb on the reel before you cast and just before the lure hits the water. Don't try to throw too far when starting. Buy a good reel there's a world of difference between cheap and good. The bass pro Qualifiers are really good I have two wish I had 3.
 

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Ditto Bill's advice on the difference between cheap and good. My first baitcaster was a second or third hand reel from a cousin. It was in really bad shape but I didn't know enough about them at the time to tell. It was a real pain to work with so I went back to all spinning reels. After I bought a better reel -and had a buddy show me the corect way to use it- it was much easier to learn. Once you get the hang of it, you'll really be able to appreciate the difference in a good reel vs a poor one and find one that's perfect for our style.

Good luck! :thumbup01:
 

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All good advice from these boys, but I have one for you to consider....buy a used Shimano Curado 200, preferably one that's been supertuned. Can usually find them online in great shape for anywhere from about $60 to $90. Best baitcaster to learn on in my opinion, and they're a very forgiving reel when it comes to backlashing. I still use these Curados on some of my setups even though I also own and fish several other brands/models that are way more expensive. Good luck!
 

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Here's a link to the best article I have ever found on how to tune a baitcasters for beginners.

http://www.fishing-tackle-repair.com/education/baitcaster-setup-101.html

I agree with all of the advice here. My first baitcaster was a $70 combo and no matter how I tried it would backlash on every third cast.
I finally saved enough for a Shimano Curado and couldn't have been happier. It works like a charm and very rarely gets a bird's nest.
Besides throwing bigger baits there are several advantages to a baitcaster vs. a spinning reel. First is the fact that a baitcaster will allow for much, much longer casts. You can also flip and pitch. Personally the waters where I live are so pressured that I tend to go with a finesse spinning rig, but I do love my Curado.
 

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There are several very good mid priced reels, 100$ range. Buy the best you can afford then sit down and read the directions, twice, they are a big help. Set up your outfit, watch line and lure size reccomendations for the rod. Tie on your bait, turn off the brake, hold the rod at a 45 degree angle and engage the free spool. On the right side of the reel you will find a knob, loosen or tighten until the bait slowly starts to fall(you should have used a line treatment when you spooled the reel), set the brakes about 2/3s, forget the tape on the spool. Slowly start casting, as you do learn to turn your hand so that the handles point up & down. As you become comfortable add more "power" to your casts, also learn to thumb the spool as the line comes off reel, the one thing you must always do is keep your motion smooth. It sounds more complicated that it is. Baitcasters, along with use of the thumb are a far more accurate way of casting, you pin point your cast much easier than you can with a spinning reel. Again, it easier than this read, but describing the cast isn't easy, casting is. In a short time you will be able to do it and with pratice you will be as good as anybody here by the end of the year.
Rodney
 

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Rodney is right, setting up the reel is a matter of personal preference and experience. Everyone has to set their reels up for their way of casting. I tend to have mine set on the loose side on the tension side, depending on the bait im casting. Get yourself a good reel, and practice, practice, and then practice somemore. In no time you will be wondering why you didnt have a baitcaster sooner.

You mentioned the Abu Garcia Orra SX reels. I have 4 of them and really like them. Im not sure if they are going to continue to produce them since they have revamped the Revo line, but if you can find one its a really good reel for the price.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for all the recommendations and advice. I've purchased a Revo Sx but haven't used it yet, sticking to spinning gear for now.

Thanks for the link Rhixso, a lot of good detailed advice and tips for baitcaster newbies there. I'm sure it will be tremendously helpful.
 
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